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Atomic Honey / Blog

A Sane Revolution by D.H. Lawrence

I think it's time to share this once more: A Sane Revolution by D.H. Lawrence If you make a revolution, make it for fun, Don't make it in ghastly seriousness, Don't do it in deadly earnest, Do it for fun. Don't do it because you hate people, Do it just to spit in their eye. Don't do it for the money, Do it and be damned the money. Don't do it for equality, Do it because we've got too much equality And it would be fun to upset the apple-cart And see which waythe apples would go a-rolling. Don't do it for the working-classes. Do it so that we can All of us be little aristocracys on our owon And kick our heels like jolly escaped asses. Don't do it, anyhow, for international labour. Labour is one thing a man has had too much of. Let's abolish labour, let's have done with labouring! Work can be fun, and Men can enjoy it; then it's not labour. Let's have it so! Let's make a revolution for fun! oxox This is a great philosophy. Embrace the awesomeness! Kev

A Special Message From Someone Who "Gets It"

Given some of the emotional turmoil many here have been through the last couple of days, I felt like sharing somethng special, something different. And, for once, I'll let someone do my speaking for me; someone who could explain this much better than me: A Sane Revolution by D.H. Lawrence If you make a revolution, make it for fun, Don't make it in ghastly seriousness, Don't do it in deadly earnest, Do it for fun. Don't do it because you hate people, Do it just to spit in their eye. Don't do it for the money, Do it and be damned the money. Don't do it for equality, Do it because we've got too much equality And it would be fun to upset the apple-cart And see which waythe apples would go a-rolling. Don't do it for the working-classes. Do it so that we can All of us be little aristocracys on our owon And kick our heels like jolly escaped asses. Don't do it, anyhow, for international labour. Labour is one thing a man has had too much of. Let's abolish labour, let's have done with labouring! Work can be fun, and Men can enjoy it; then it's not labour. Let's have it so! Let's make a revolution for fun! xxxxxxx This is a great philosophy. Embrace the awesomeness! Kev

Cougar Ace
Cougar Ace  (over 3 years ago)

We were so motivated by your D.H. Lawrence we lit a couch on fire! Great writing in the blog!

CA

The Yearbook Club & How I Became A Stoner...Sort Of

I did well in school as a teenager, and often got invited to things like the yearbook club, honor society, etc. I always turned down those offers--I knew even then these things just weren't for me. Most of the reason I did well in school was because I didn't like it--I just wanted out. It was a business to me-punch in, do your work, punch out, go home. I didn't fit in well with any of the groups:not athletic enough for the jocks, not handsome or rich enough for the preps, not quite lame enough for the geeks. I did my own thing. I used to spend lunches in the music room most of the time, practicing guitar which was something I actually was good at. It was there I discovered a new group of people--the stoners. A long-haired dude with a skeleton shirt approached me in the music room and we hit it off right way. One long-haired dude turned into another, then another, and suddenly there was a group of us meeting up in the music room every day. We'd be in awe of some dude that showed up and played "Master Of Puppets" perfectly or hear yet another rendition of Randy Rhoades' "Dee." I had short hair and got good grades, didn't smoke didn't get high. These guys didn't care-we bonded because of our love for music--mostly metal. Some of these guys became life-long friends (and I'll save you the suspense--to this day I've never gotten stoned). When considering the yearbook club one day, I noticed how many in there had ulterior motives. Some wanted to be popular, some wanted good transcripts, some wanted control over whose picture was going to appear in the yearbook the most times. I walked away. That was the day I became a stoner...sort of. I am who I am, and try and surround myself with people who ARE who they ARE. I will never settle for less. Ever. Read between the lines...and have an awesome day.

Overdue Musings On The Uncertainty Principle

If I remember correctly (it's been a while), Heisenberg's uncertainty principle stated basically that on the sub-atomic level, we can know either the momentum of a particle OR it's location. We cannot know both, however, because on the sub-atomic level, an energy exchange occurs due to our observing the particle, causing it to change its postion. In other words, observing something changes it. I'm inclined to apply this concept to music. I believe the listener has the ability to "change" the music to a certain degree. I believe if someone is actively listening to a song, they have the power of trasformiing that song (if it is well-done, and ESPECIALLY if the production is good) into something that might suit them more, even if it's a song that normally wouldn't appeal to them stylistically. This opens the door for that unity between artist and listener that is the "holy grail" that I've sought for many years--and continue to seek after in the form of Atomic Honey. I want to find a way to not only have our listeners enjoy and relate to our songs, but to actually become a part of the songs. This is much easier done live, of course, and the reason live shows will continue to thrive regardless of downward trends in the industry. My thoughts. Embrace the awesomeness, my friends! Kev

Joshua W. Scott
Joshua W. Scott  (over 3 years ago)

And Schroedinger's cat! Great blogs. It is funny that the yearbook club mentality exists in adults too.

Active Listening & The Uncertainty Principle

About 4 years ago I got turned onto vintage audio equipment after stumbling onto an old Sansui Quad from '73 at a thrift store. Even through cheap speakers, the amazing difference in sound jumped out right away. I've sinced learned a lot more, have added many more awesome vintage amps, top-notch vintage speakers, pre-amps, and even learned the superiority of D/A converters over CD players. The reason I bring this up is because, about this time, I started "actively" listening to music for the 1st time in my life. By "active," I mean I didn't just listen to the music and words--I shut my eyes and discovered what a sound-field was, that I could get inside it, and discover where certain nuances and overtones were located in this invisible sphere. This was really the beginning of what would become Atomic Honey. I learned that music is 3-dimensional, and that by adjusting things, you could re-locate things in the sound-field. I learned that panning left & right doesn't JUST make it go left or right--it relocates it in the sphere, like the tilt of a planet. After re-discovering many old classics this way, the desire came to manipulate my OWN music this way. So ultimately, this is what I'm after to this day, and I'm starting to zero in on it just a little--finding OUR sound, I mean. Our music is meant to be listened to in this manner--most of it anyway. You do not get the effect by listening through an iPod dock, headphones, or one of those 1500w surround sound sytems from Costco. We hope our listeners will take the time to shut their eyes, enter the sound-field, and absorb the overtones. I was going to connect this to Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle, but I've already written more than I intended. I will save that for the next entry. Stay tuned and awesome! Kev

Atomic Love Theory

A lot of beautiful things have happened for Atomic Honey the last couple of weeks that are the direct result of beautiful support from beautiful people. I've met a lot of amazing people on ReverbNation over the last few months, but lately I've felt like it's time to think about genuine love amongst artists for a few minutes. We are all here to succeed in one way or another:some want to make money, some want their songs heard, some want to be famous, and some just need to pour out their soul. All are valid reasons, of course. I learned from a book years ago (The Road Less Traveled by M. Scott Peck) that genuine love really has nothing to do with feelings and emotions. If you show someone genuine love, your only hope for them is to grow--mentally, spiritually--and even musically. In brief, love builds people up and encourages them. Illegitimate love tends to tell people what they want to hear which often doesn't help them to grow. I do not think that telling a new, aspiring artists that their music is great without even listening to it is a good thing--for any of the parties involved. Fan 'em, sure--we all need the numbers--I get that--but be sincere about it. And if you can't find anything at all nice to say about their music, then don't say anything--just fan them back and leave it at that. Or don't. Just be sincere. I call this Atomic Love Theory because the best way to build people up is to tear them down (and yes, this can be done in a warm and loving manner). Break things down to the atomic level so they can release energy and rebuild themselves into a higher state. Many of us here are used to insincerity that happens on this site from time to time, but please let's think of the new people that are scared, insecure and still feeling their way around. Be honest with them; build them up; love them--genuinely. --Kev (Atomic Honey)

Three

My song "Three" was actually inspired by my daughter, Angel, who was--you guessed it--3 years old at the time. One morning she came into my room to wake me up, and her face was glowing with excitement. She said "Dada, guess what?!" I asked her what, and she replied "I just woke up the sun." I said "Really--that's awesome. How did you do it?" She shrugged her shoulders, smiling, and told me, "I just looked out my window (her room faces east) and said Sun, wake up--and it did!" The song just fell into place. I had the entire structure laid-out before dinnertime. Easiest song I've ever done--it literally wrote itself (with a little help from Angel). I titled the song "Three" because she was 3 years old, there are three of us (me, my son, and my daughter), and as a tribute to the Holy Trinity.

Joshua W. Scott
Joshua W. Scott  (almost 4 years ago)

Great inspiration.

Stratego

Those of you who have spent adequate time playing the board game Stratego probably know that the real key to winning this game is keeping your Marshall hidden for as long as possible (to those of you unfamiliar, I can offer little help, sadly). Over the years, I've learned that this applies to our lives in general. Though the ultimate goal may be to capture the opponent's flag, your best chance at doing that is in not revealing your full potential unless it becomes absolutely necessary. Here's the best part: if you've played the game properly, you'll never have to.

The Speed Of Light

It's an interesting (and little-known) fact that there is very little difference between a note you play on an instrument and a particle of light. By definition, the only thing that travels at the speed of light is, in fact, light. If you were to play a note on an instrument and accelerate it to the speed of light, it would be indistinguishable from light. Audio becomes visual; music becomes imagery--quite literally.

Raven's Milk
Raven's Milk  (almost 4 years ago)

So if notes can become light, then our songs can become entire spectrums, no?