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Lezlie Harrison / Press

“The first set was sung by Lezlie Harrison, a theatrical singer with an admirable instrument and exceptional stage presence. Highlights of her performance included a deep reading of Abbey Lincoln’s “Throw it Away”, an unhurried “What a Little Moonlight Can Do” and a tender tribute to recently departed jazz giant, James Moody, “Moody’s Mood for Love”.”

“New York native Lezlie Harrison’s voice has a dusky soulfulness which complements her chosen repertoire of jazz, '70s classic soul and original material. Raised in Harlem during a time when African-American and Latin music styles were in full flower, she also spent a great deal of her childhood in North Carolina, singing in the choir of her grandfather’s church. This deep grounding in gospel, blues, Latin and soul can be heard every time Harrison sings and has led people like Roy Hargrove and Dr. Lonnie Smith to seek out her sultry and sensual presence on the bandstand. ”

".(Harrison) knows how to deliver lyrics with feeling and tempo"

“New York native Lezlie Harrison’s voice has a dusky soulfulness which complements her chosen repertoire of jazz, '70s classic soul and original material. Raised in Harlem during a time when African-American and Latin music styles were in full flower, she also spent a great deal of her childhood in North Carolina, singing in the choir of her grandfather’s church. This deep grounding in gospel, blues, Latin and soul can be heard every time Harrison sings and has led people like Roy Hargrove and Dr. Lonnie Smith to seek out her sultry and sensual presence on the bandstand.”

"Last Tuesday night at Smalls, the basement jazz club on the tiny slice of West 10th Street just off Seventh Avenue South, singer Lezlie Harrison had just completed her set. She took a seat at the bar to warm welcomes from friends"

““I live in Crown Heights now, but I grew up in East Harlem. On the way here I’m like, “Look at this, single white women walking alone on 114th Street, wineshops, cat-food stores.” Part of me was happy, part of me hopes the original residents can afford to live here.””