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Daryl Hance / Press

““Daryl Hance has crafted a psychedelic fuzz bomb of hot water soul. His very southern sounding music has all the sophistication of british pop, but comes via simple arrangements. Wild Blue Iris is that crucial summertime album you’ve been looking for. You can put it on and let it rock dependably in the background, or you can choose to engage it, to marinate in it’s warmth and positivity, and be washed over by it’s rock ‘n’ roll…””

““A musical melange, packed with hypnotic grooves and a vintage edge, with tunes reminiscent of the free love generation of the 1960s and early 1970s, and a fun blend of blues and funk.””

““Rock and blues with a swampy, psychedelic vibe. Wild Blue Iris boasts old school charm, from early 70’s funk to fuzzed-out vintage guitar playing.””

Star News Online

““Daryl Hance, a native of the upper swamps of Florida, has an innate and undeniable groove, built on deep south drawling guitar grooves bordering on trance-adelic. His third and finest album Wild Blue Iris, establishes Daryl as the king of the swamp blues””

Devil Down Records

"This record "Land Of Trembling Earth" is unbelievable! As thick and real as it gets. Moving from beautiful laments to haunting bluesy rock bombs, grooving nastily while spitting and grinding away with the ferocity of a busted chainsaw!"

"The “land of trembling earth” referenced in Daryl Hance’s record of the same name is the English translation of the Hitchiti Creek American Indian word that gives name to the Okefenokee Swamp in southeastern Georgia. Hance’s music is appropriately swampy, a brackish blend of Luther Dickinson grit, Fogerty brothers choogle and Dex Romweber twang. Befitting of a swamp-themed outfit, this trio’s sweltering jams are thick with humidity — and, as we all know, it’s not really about the heat, but the humidity."

“Seated onstage all those years in Mofro, one might have missed what a six-string monster Daryl Hance is, but there’s no mistaking how he’s right in line with contemporaries like The Black Keys’ Dan Auerbach and North Mississippi Allstars/Black Crowes man Luther Dickinson on his welcome solo debut, Hallowed Ground. The album reveals what a goddamn sexy player Hance truly is, as well as showing off his ear-catching songwriting and singing skills – there’s something of John Fogerty to the whole package actually. It’s Southern rock with a psychedelic lover man’s twist, and anyone who likes it humid and right in the pocket is likely to plotz over Hallowed Ground.”

“Hallowed Ground presents a fully rounded musician who’s clearly been storing up gems for years in anticipation of this moment. There’s not a dud in the bunch on Hance’s debut, a lovingly crafted set delivered in a pleasantly weathered croon. In short, one of the best first albums of 2011 and essential listening for anyone who digs raw Southern accented rock ‘n’ roll. Dennis Cook - Jambase”

“The debut release by Daryl Hance “Hallowed Ground” is a remarkably well-made album of agile, bulletproof rockers and contemplative ballads. On the harder cuts, Hance’s guitar is all crackling fury, his solos sounding like they were peeled off as he sat on his amp, another half-joint burning in the ashtray. The 13 tracks run the gamut from rockers to tasteful balladry, Hance’s chilled-out vocal delivery finding company with JJ Cale or fellow Okie, the sorely underrated Jesse Ed Davis. The acoustic cuts “In the Dark” and “A Breath Away” find a weird nexus between Jerry Jeff Walker and the narcotic cadence of David Gilmour from 1970s-era Pink Floyd. Dan Brown - Folio Weekly ”

“With his debut album Hallowed Ground, Daryl Hance has stepped out from his 12-year long role as guitarist for southern rock and soul band JJ Grey & Mofro, just as if compadre Grey and his Mofro cohorts eased their skiff up close enough to the bank for Hance to jump off and venture back out into his own neck of the woods. A landscape decorated by an unrelenting sonic-blast of groovin' rock and roll music built of humid-heavy blues-driven guitar grooves, fully-cranked funky riffs, soothing slide and acoustic guitars. All cushioning a very laid back and largely introspective vocal style atop thick bass lines and pocket-locked drums. Consisting of thirteen original positive-charged Hance compositions, Hallowed Ground...”

Press Release-Hallowed Ground

“Beers were flowing at the Funky Buddha on Friday, and three bands scheduled that night gave us everything they had, if only for a short while. Daryl Hance of Mofro fame was down from Jacksonville on his 15th stop of a short solo tour of the Southeast. And it might truly be only his 20th or so show out on his own, singing his own songs, playing lead, and just being Daryl. Joined by Shane Platten on bass and Jon Farmer on drums from openers the Yankee Slickers, Daryl's little three-piece had a grunge to it and often sounded of a dirge. Not quite blues, not quite rock. For sure not Tom Waits or Hendrix, yet I heard it in there. More than anything, it was music with humidity, if that makes any sense. Like Junior Kimbrough humid, or RL Burnside. Just up-on-your-shoulders humid, pressing down. Sticky. I presume J. Mascis and Alex Chilton would have been inspired Friday night at the Buddha. As well as Cobain and Young. It was all good ol' American music.”

“Many know Daryl Hance as the right hand man to Mofro frontman JJ Grey. Now, Hance -- the quiet and sincere dude who sits calmly on stage, eyes closed with his Fender, weaving its electricity masterfully through the band's deep, front porch soul grooves -- has embarked on his first solo tour which stops at the Funky Buddha Lounge in Boca Raton on Friday. The solo project is a big change from anything Hance has done before. The 20 or so shows he's played thus far have been his first experiences singing for people outside of his garage, and the gigs have been of a different sort than the large club and festival gigs he's become accustomed to playing with JJ Grey and Mofro. Recently, New Times had the chance to chat with Daryl about the experience of going solo thus far, the downside of the loop machine, and his relationship with JJ Grey and Mofro.”