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Circles / Press

“We’re always on the lookout around here for new musics and bands. And despite what you might think, sometimes we find good ones. We recently just came across a new outfit of familiar faces from Chicago called Circles. And – even though it seems to primarily be a recording project or studio band – shit is sounding like Springtime to the max. The band is comprised of former members of France Has The Bomb, The Ponys, Holy Ghost, and Football and has us excited to hear what they’ve got lined up next for us. You can check out a new track - “Curses” – right down there. It’s jangly and poppy and right under the 3-minute mark so I think that means it meets all requirements for being a “solid pop song”. Here’s to hoping for a physical release sometime soon since it doesn’t seem likely we’ll catch them in the flesh and blood anytime…”

“hicago is a garage rock hotbed, with labels like Hozac Records in town and a ton of great bands. Circles is a new band featuring a former local of our own, R. Srini of France Has The Bomb on guitar and vocals (along with Melissa Elias of the Ponys and Ken Coulman of Sang De Loups). “Curses” is the second song posted to the band’s Soundcloud and is a great under-3-minute pop number with vocal harmonies.”

“Far too many kids who start bands think of cities as "markets" and touring as "expanding the brand," so it's encouraging to hear about Circles, who look to be guided by the simple principle that (to paraphrase a maxim Vince Lombardi made famous) making the best music you can isn't everything; it's the only thing. Guitarist Srini Radhakrishna (Football), bassist Melissa Elias (the Ponys), and drummer Ken Coulman (the Holy Ghosts) started the group as a home-recording project, just for the sake of doing it, and they've got the understated confidence of people who've played in bands for their entire adult lives and know what they like and what they can do—plus they understand what kind of magic can happen when you trust the collaborative efforts of longtime friends. The result is a chiaroscuro of midtempo jangle pop for Daydream Nationalists: the transcendent soar of "Black Eyes," the pounding, delirious march of "Photographs of Naked Ladies," the Pixies-ish snaking and caterwauling of.”