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Catherine Feeny / Press

“Songs that are so delicate and intimate that you’re scared to interrupt their suspended magic...”

"As moving and enjoyable as it is socially and politically relevant...”

"She works gently as Joni Mitchell with a Ricki Lee Jones pop sensibility, and Chris accents that nicely, syncopating jazzy drumbeats that react to her rhythms. It’s a strange and powerful sound..."

““Infectiously listenable and like nothing you’ve heard before...””

"...Catherine Feeny’s voice melted my cynical bastardism in the beat of an infarcted heart. Her music cut through the ‘Kafkaesque’ lighting like an aural sculpture, underlined by complex percussion that gave surprising variety to her tiny ensemble. "

" I imagine that Suzanne Vega might sound like this if she hooked up with Joe Strummer. Feeny's high, eerie wail and spare, tense ukulele lines kicked any hint of twee to the curb..."

"Feeny paints with the paintbrush of revolution, songs are uplifting and unifying; not despite of but because of the fragile country they sing about..."

Cincinnati Music Examiner

"Catherine Feeny’s songs are entrancing... You can hear a passion behind her experimental pop songs that carries with it both nostalgia and innovation..."

“Feeny’s songs are often those of an exile... her low key, quietly devastating delivery sounding somewhere between Joni Mitchell and Billie Holiday...”

“Hurricane Glass is one of those albums that soothes the listener into quietude... and only then coils its complications and ambiguities around you...”

Dan Cairns - The Sunday Times

“If Catherine Feeny was an explorer, she would wade into crocodile-infested waters and emerge without a scratch...”

Dave Simpson - The Guardian

“The former Pennsylvanian pens songs with subtle ambiguity... fooling the listener into a false sense of security before she drops her dark lyrics.”

Music Weekly