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Nonstop to Cairo / Blog

Live Performance (vs) Media Hype

Not much to say about this one. I leave it to you. Back before there was the internet one would go out to clubs and see new groups perform. By "one" I mean both fans and Music Industry Reps alike. That was the only way to find local talent. Now you almost never have to play a show. You literally could record songs, take some pro. photo's and create any number of pages on the internet to hype the group. You can have hundreds, even thousands of fans and never have met them in person. It's a double edged sword, I guess. While web promotion is a huge benefit to artists these days, it hampers the raw energy and grit of the live experience. Personally, if a band doesn't have a good live show, I'm not that interested. What do you think? Matt Ezzo(bass) Nonstop to Cairo

Originality (vs) The Music Industry

It would seem that in this day in age the business of music has taken over. Understood, the artists share a mutually beneficial relationship when managed correctly, but when the scale tips in favor of business it could mean the downfall of the arts. To our way of thinking the arts as a whole and in this case specifically music is relyant on originality to bulster the future of music. Every new sound is based off the new sounds of the past. Inturn, every new sound will create the new sounds of the future. This is why we feel it's important to respect the great music of yesteryear, but forge new genres entirely when composing the music of tomorrow. The Music Industry having grown so large and wealthy now has to spend every waking hour supporting itself. It takes alot of money to keep big business on it's feet. The saying "The bigger they are the harder they fall" is all too apt in this contexted. Major Labels can't afford to take a risk on an unproven sound because it could mean the end of their label. That's why musical fads are milked dry. Every sound is played until no one wants to hear anymore. This kills that genre indefinitely and absolutely. It's happened again and again in any art really. You have the first artist to come up with something completely original and then a flood of similar sounding artist following in tow. Too much of anything isn't good. So while you must pay omage to the greats who came before you... Be unique and inspire the originality of tomorrow. Thanks for reading. Matt Ezzo(bass) Nonstop to Cairo