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martha ann motel / Press

“Martha Ann Motel polishes its roots rock, adding huge, poppy hooks that move with arena ambitions. The four tracks—included with tonight's admission as a free digital download—keep frontman and songwriter David Teeter's soul-searching melancholy intact over bombastics guitars. Both openers possess a bit more twang, whether it's the orchestral Americana spin on a Southwestern carnival by Chapel Hill septet Puritan Rodeo or the jangly indie folk of Raleigh quartet The Kings English, featuring members of Hadwynn.”

“04.30 AMERICAN AQUARIUM, MARTHA ANN MOTEL @ THE POUR HOUSE There's no use looking in Hampstead, N.C., if you'd like to see the Martha Ann Motel. The Raleigh band sporting the shuttered establishment's name has been playing together since early 2008, throwing a country tilt onto pop-rock melodies. Their big brothers in Americana, American Aquarium, take that blended Southern style to the next level, in both sound and scope. BJ Barham and his crew have pushed for five years over five albums, parlaying a road warrior work ethic into a masterful roots rock sound. It's a combination that's garnered them increased media attention and, just prior to this show, a featured spot at the Netherlands Blues Highway Festival.”

“If you ever desired to explore every contour of the forsaken country of longing and loss, the alternative folk/rock band Martha Ann Motel can take you there. This Raleigh band has David Teeter on lead guitar and vocals, followed by Chad Reed on backup guitar and Jon McClain on keyboards and electric mandolin. The band produced a surprisingly big sound, despite lead singer Teeter’s slender frame and the fact that the band was missing their drummer, Adam Efird, that night. Teeter’s soaring vocals are saturated by the careful strumming of the two guitars, making a sonic effect that is both melodic and relentless in its desire to ease the pain the songs uncover.”