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Little Doses / Press

“Ross has the sex, voice and capability of being a bona fide rock chick. And it’s clear the band can pack a punch. ... Playing rock music that bestows a breezy, alt-country, American pop twist, their live sound is as tight as their ties and as powerfully bright as guitarist, Chris Alderson’s danger-red shirt. ... The short 40-minute set is well measured, dynamic in all the right places, and complimented by the interplay between the group’s two guitarists. In short, a fine example of their talent. ... For the moment, though, it looks like all their hard work and effort is about to pay off. We wish them well. ... ”

“Bass lines are fat and distorted, drums are hard and funky, and singer Kirsten Ross (think Catwoman meets Cristina Martinez from 90s garage rockers Boss Hog) can screech and croon with equally devastating effect.”

The Daily Record

“The first song kicks off with a thunderously sexy bass line and they frantically tear through an adrenaline laced set. The guitarist looks captivated, fitting his way through songs before pulling a face like a shy schoolboy caught out when each song ends. Quite a tough act to follow.”

“’A wall of no-frills rock n’ roll that commands full attention immediately, with catchy seventies-styled guitar-licks ”

The Skinny Magazine

“From the obvious sense of camaraderie they exude through to Kirsten Ross’s feisty delivery – of new ditty Juniper Hill in particular - the black ’n’ red brigade continues to build a strong head of steam. Somewhere an A&R man sleeps.”

The Skinny magazine

“Kirsten’s elegant vocal glide lends an air of sophistication to aching country-infused numbers like the wondrous Come Back Home, yet a foreboding menace lurks throughout; with Monster & Me’s crunching riff and plundering percussion threatening to explode into an incessant, four-pronged ruckus”

The Skinny magazine