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Jenee Halstead / Press

“The River Grace one of the best Americana albums of 2008, a fact that opened itself up to me when I had marked half of the ten songs for ripping onto my computer the first time I heard the cd.”

“The EP Hollow Bones is Boston-based Jenee Halstead's sophomore release, following her debut full-length The River Grace. Her exquisite alto serves her equally well, delivering silky-smooth ballads, or belting out country blues. The title song, Hollow Bones, is Halstead at her best. A glowing, bittersweet country waltz that drools emotion. The kind of song that often gets over-produced in the studio, but Halstead keeps the crew in line, giving us a mellow arrangement with the right mix of instruments (soft percussion, bass, acoustic and electric guitar, pedal steel, and the wonderful and mysterious male vocals).”

“In just ten songs, Halstead manages to say and do so much, in ways few other artists can. Her spirit and her voice reveal a singer/songwriter who seems to have been around the block many times before and has both a voice and stories that are wise beyond her years. These are the kind of songs that send artists to legendary status and place themselves in museums. That this is just her debut is remarkable. Her tender alto has the same tenderness and sensitivity that folk stalwarts Patty Griffin, Emmylou Harris and Shawn Colvin have worn to prominence and that future seems almost certain for Halstead.”

“Jenee Halstead has sprung from Harvard Square’s Club Passim, in Cambridge Massachusetts, the same fertile ground that has in the recent past set Josh Ritter and Lori McKenna on their way to bigger things. Jenee has a pretty, but fairly traditional sounding voice not dissimilar to Emmylou, like Joni but with fewer acrobatics, she also has an element of vulnerability in her singing that makes her believable, emotionally affecting and very listenable.”

“After her excellent 2008 debut album The River Grace, rising roots singer-songwriter Jenee Halstead treats us to a fine new EP called Hollow Bones. Where The River Grace cut a fine line between folk and Americana, Hollow Bones opts for a more countrified approach, with five charming songs in a diversity of country styles, ranging from pure country (Damascus) via country-swing (Good Lookin’ Boy) and country-noir (La Luna Roja) to country-blues (Banks Of The Mississippi). Best of all though is the melancholy title song, whose style harks back most to the kind of material found on The River Grace.”