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Freequency / Press

“Freequency, “Angels Wading”: The nine tracks on “Angels Wading” — eight originals and a cover of the traditional “Angel Band” — aren’t fancy or lavish. They’re not adorned with studio trickery or layered with dozens of tracks; the lyrics aren’t cryptic statements about world affairs or deep insights into the human heart. What they are, however, is genuine — warm, soulful reflections on friendship and family, stories conjured from the ether and adorned with the gorgeous harmonies of Meredith Whitehead and fellow singer-songwriter Michele Williams, finished off with Kirk Whitehead’s nimble finger work and a groove that works well on outdoor patios by the lake or in a dark music hall as the clock approaches midnight. It’s little wonder that Freequency is in demand as a trio (or duo) at venues all over East Tennessee; the country-folk the band skirts the rock line but doesn’t obliterate it, making the band a perfect choice for casual fans and avid devourers of”

"The nine tracks on “Angels Wading” — eight originals and a cover of the traditional “Angel Band” — aren’t fancy or lavish. They’re not adorned with studio trickery or layered with dozens of tracks; the lyrics aren’t cryptic statements about world affairs or deep insights into the human heart. What they are, however, is genuine — warm, soulful reflections on friendship and family, stories conjured from the ether and adorned with the gorgeous harmonies of Meredith and fellow singer-songwriter Michele Williams, finished off with Kirk’s nimble finger work and a groove that works well on outdoor patios by the lake or in a dark music hall as the clock approaches midnight."

“It may not seem like much to the uninitiated, one guy, one guitar, two girls. Before Freequency is dismissed as a lightweight acoustic outfit, however, do yourself a favor: Stick around and listen to a couple of songs. Because once the girls open their mouths and those golden voices come pouring forth, you’ll be amazed at just how big they sound and how little the lack of additional instruments seems to matter.”