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Banks and Cathedrals / Press

“HandleBar is a brand new concept bar smack in the middle of The Grove. The bike-friendly watering hole is on a mission: sustainability, increasing bike traffic on the Manchester strip, supporting local indie craft brewers and artisans, and having a damn good time doing it. Located in the old Church Key/Bar 5 location, it's luckily not a hangout for imperious bike elitists (though anyone who bikes in gets a “special surprise”). It's just a damn fine place for a drink. With kinetic bike art on the walls and stellar murals by local artists, HandleBar is a unique, fun and smoke-free addition to the well-established block. Be on the lookout for the bike tune up station planned for the back patio, plus a soon-to-be sustainable garden, powered by a nifty stationary bike irrigation system.”

“The brand-spankin' new Jumpin' Jupiter is St. Louis' first and only neo-supper club--inspired by the cabarets of old, the Jupiter offers burlesque, freak shows, and live music. Manager Ryan Callahan uses the Tropicana from I Love Lucy as an example of what they're going for. "You'd have a seat, you'd have a show, there was a stage, there was a house band. It was reliable every single time. Over the past 40 years, we've degraded into chaos -- we stopped having a high expectation of good food and entertainment."”

“The Gramophone is one of the stalwarts of the Grove's burgeoning nightclub scene. The venue prides itself on booking a stylistically diverse mix of music, from up and coming hip hop acts to bloghouse DJs and swampy Delta blues. The Gramophone is also the new home of legendary bi-weekly dance party London Calling. With its classy yet laid-back feel, non-smoking policy and great drink selection, the Gramophone is suitable for just about any genre.”

“Fred's Six Foot Under has the feel of a private club, albeit one where you enter through the kitchen of the restaurant upstairs, the mystery of food preparation garishly laid out under fluorescent lights. But there's nothing garish about the confines below: It's a musical oasis where cramped quarters make for fast friends. The Chippewa Chapel Open Mic night every Thursday is almost, but not quite, as legendary as the bar's namesake and affable bartender, Fred Friction. Iron Barley lent him its basement after Friction's bar Frederick's Music Lounge closed in 2006, and the rest is history. The teeny room only holds 30 people amid its collection of mid-century flair and pop-meets-folk art, but a small sign above the stage reads “Chapel,” letting you know you've found the perfect synthesis of unlikely characters, awesome tunes and booze - a sacred combination.”