x

ABOLISHMENT OF FLESH / Press

“I learned that they were also a local metal band called Abolishment of Flesh, which is supremely ironic because instead of abolishing flesh, they live to sustain the good fortunes of everyone they know. In any event, I got to know Jess (promoter) and Ramon (guitarist/ vocalist) Cazares over the next few months. I think of them as the hearts of local metal. Hearts, plural. I went to see Abolishment of Flesh and kept tabs on their national Brutal Alliance tour, in which they partnered with New Mexico neighbors Fields of Elysium. Par for the course, the bands shared everything along the way. It was part tour (death metal overground, I like to call it), part family vacation.”

“Album opener Slaves of Animosity kicks off the brutality with a pounding slab of heavy guitars, furious drumming and guttural vocals. There is a strong Katakalysm influence on display here, especially in the guitar work. This isn’t a bad thing however, as the band are able to work with this and create a powerful work of original metal, whilst remaining true to their influences. Second Track, Morbid Imagery takes the music down a different, slightly more melodic route, but still remains as brutal as ever. Vocalist Ramon Cazares hints at a Nathan Explosion/Brendan Small influenced vocal delivery, with rapid fire bursts of guttural screams. Song three on the album, Inhuman Anatomy maintains the barrage of heaviness, possibly being the heaviest song on the album. While being short, it blasts along, with some thrashy guitar riffs and relentless double bass drumming. There is also a short but tasty guitar solo amongst the heaviness, which works very well.”

“As metal continues to grow in popularity, outsiders to the genre find it more appealing. They see it as an unknown region, or an exotic culture, and in comparison their lives seem drab. What is it that makes hordes of people headbang to violent and abrasive music? This was the question the Amarillo Globe News posed to death metal band Abolishment of Flesh and it received an answer it might not have been expecting. The band painted a picture of death metal different from what is commonly presented in the media: “There are a lot of different things going on at the same time,” [guitarist] Cazares said. “It’s very comparable to classical music.” “We have a lot of weird time signatures and different changes like classical music does,” bass player Chuy Camacho said. “There can be three different things going on in the music at the same time.””

"These guys aren't in it for the money," said Ramon Cazares, whose band Abolishment plays at The War Legion. "These guys are fans, and not just fans of death metal music, but music in general." That love of music and passion to keep the venue open resonates with young fans searching for diversity in the music scene, Cazares said. "Usually when people come in here, especially if they don't know what you sound like, they have a really good time," he said. "They're just interested. That's all it takes."

“Ramon Cazares knows what reputation his brand of music has. “It used to be that people thought it was a bunch of Satanists,” Cazares said. “Now it’s more that it’s more vulgar. We try to stay away from all that.” To his ears, the style of death metal his band, Abolishment of Flesh, plays has a much loftier frame of reference “There are a lot of different things going on at the same time,” Cazares said. “It’s very comparable to classical music.” He’s totally serious about that, however odd it may sound to those not versed in death metal. “We have a lot of weird time signatures and different changes like classical music does,” bass player Chuy Camacho said. “There can be three different things going on in the music at the same time.” “Basically, it’s a subgenre of metal, but more extreme,” Cazares said. “It has all the elements of any style of music out there, but it’s aggressive and angry ”