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Daniel G. Harmann & the Trouble Starts / Press

“I declare the "scene" has a new genre. Old Core. Old Core is when you are in your upper 20s and early 30s and done with the hardcore/post shows and purposely closed your eyes during the mid 2000 hell on earth Bamboozle shit show, waiting for it to blow over. Our reward as we arrive in 2010/2011 is a byproduct of the love of indie/british music as our tastes expand in addition to not forgetting the knowledge of the old days. You have been biding your time patiently and combined them into a new genre without even knowing. Old is new again and couldn't have sounded any more genuine. One such band that takes those two sides with effortless ease is Daniel G. Harmann & The Trouble Starts. Half way through the album we are greeted with our first great rise of emotion with "Knob Creek Neat". Daniel's voice knows when to take the lead and carry a song as with "Dee" and then sits back and lets the song takeover for the best ending to a song I have heard all year.”

“Offering eleven tracks worth of extremely moody, intense, and melodic rock, Daniel G. Harmann and his group register strongly with an incredibly dense and atmospheric album that lingers long in your mind after you’re finished listening to it. Harmann’s soft, slight, yet sturdy and compelling voice and thoughtful and reflective songwriting deliver a potent one-two punch full of rare and refreshing maturity and intelligence. However, it’s the complex and intricately layered arrangements which lift this item well outside the ordinary: brooding basslines, quivery ringing guitars, and subdued, but persistent drums all come together to create a haunting, swirling, and harmonic buzz of a captivating sound that positively drips angst and emotion from every anguished note. A fine and impressive album.”

“The 6th album from Daniel G. Harmann & co. is a first-rate set of moody indie-pop with rumbling, atmospheric guitar lines that explode into crunchy, rangy solos combined with soft, wispy vocals and a variety of catchy pop hooks.”

“After just one listen, it’s easy to see Daniel G. Harmann & the Trouble Starts shows oodles and oodles of promise. The band’s new album, Risk, isn’t necessarily a risk, even if the lyrics reflect risky behavior or the desire to take some chances. Really it’s a beautifully composed album that’s perfect in many ways musically. There’s plenty of airy, sonic landscape without sacrificing any hooks. There’s a fuzzy shoe-gaze like sound here mixed with the post-rock beauty and flair of bands like God is an Astronaut or Explosions in the Sky. Some songs do sound like pieces by those bands, but with lyrics to go with them. This is a powerful album that can blow you away without having to feel loud or forced. There isn’t really a single disappointment here. Risk isn’t a risk. It feels just right. Grade: 9.5 Golden Eggs Top tracks: All of them”

“Using vivid imagery, Harmann’s songs detail personal accounts of hard labor, love for his family, battling demons, as well as several other pivotal topics in his life. A variety of different autobiographical stories are shared, and similarly Harmann and The Trouble Starts play an eclectic style of music that shares many different genres across the rock spectrum. From gentle guitar strumming to louder, soaring moments, Harmann and company play soothing, gentle folk inspired rock that brings to mind lo-fi moments of Sebadoh or the melodic and fuzzy droning of bands like Sonic Youth. Though at it’s core it is rock’n'roll disc, it moves from sparse to detailed, loud to soft, and pushes and pulls with graceful tension, never staying in one place too long. An amazing disc here, this needs to be listened to repeatedly to truly be appreciated- one of the years best for sure.””

““The band has crafted an album (RISK) that is difficult to pigeonhole as it lives and breathes at two separate corners only to meet somewhere perfectly in the middle between the elegant and the abrasive… On ‘Risk’, Harmann and his band have created an intriguing collection of working class art rock with a full, sweeping sound leaving the pretense firmly at the door.””

“For Risk, his sixth album, Seattle’s Daniel G. Harmann has beefed up his sound with The Trouble Starts. Harmann describes the new album as a collection of “Big songs you dream about making and playing to lots of people”. The album was recorded live over five days at Electrokitty Studios with Long Winters bassist Eric Corson. The band has crafted an album that is difficult to pigeonhole as it lives and breathes at two separate corners only to meet somewhere perfectly in the middle between the elegant and the abrasive. “Call it what you will,” Harmann says, “but at its core, its rock and roll. It’s dirty and imperfect. It’s quiet and loud.” On Risk, Harmann and his band have created an intriguing collection of working class art rock with a full, sweeping sound leaving the pretense firmly at the door.”

“Chances are if you've heard of Burning Building Recordings it's because the label released The Lonely Forest's We Sing The Body Electric. Although The Lonely Forest left the label for greener pastures earlier this year there are still quite a few excellent BBR acts worth paying attention to and all of those artists are featured on the label's free sampler that's being offered on Amazon.com. The sampler includes the fuzzy guitar rock of Daniel G. Harmann & the Trouble Starts, an unreleased Speaker Speaker demo, the epic instrumental jams of Post Harbor, and more making it well worth a download.”

“Daniel was backed by the Trouble Starts, a.k.a. Forest Haskell on bass, Shea Bliss on drums and newest member Kelly Dale on guitar. Harmann's typically hushed sounds took on new sonic qualities that elevated the songs to more rock territory. Guitarist Kelly Dale created gorgeous washes of sound while Haskell and Bliss provided a solid backbone for Harmann's terrific songs. Playing the hits from his many great records along with some new ones from the upcoming release "Risk" out Oct. 26th on Burning Building Records. The Comet erupted at the end of the set with the first notes of the excellent "Last Swim of the Year" and the band launched into a gripping version that was a little like a post hardcore Sigur Ros with bouncing bass, epic guitar swells and haunting melodies throughout. Excellent show!”