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THE MISSIONARY POSITION / Press

"...vocalist/guitaristJeff Angell (formerly found fronting Post Stardom Depression) and multi-instrumentalist Benjamin Anderson (key bass, organ and piano) sound like a pair of semi-destructive, erotic alchemists on their new album, Diamonds in a Dead Sky. Musically, we're talking straight-forward, blues-based hard rock, with slivers of psychedelia stuck under its fingers, but the easy soul and libidinous swagger pushing behind it is what sets it apart from your average bar band. Angell is getting a lot of comparisons to Mark Lanegan, and while I hear that, I'm also sensing a splash of Gutter Twin Greg Dulli in his delivery."

"...a quick listen to Diamonds in a Dead Sky, the Missionary Position's latest full-length, reveals rich, sonically diverse songwriting coupled with emotionally raw performances in all the right places. Although a lot of bluesy rock-and-roll these days is nothing more than a living museum piece, this quartet doesn't seem trapped by tradition. Utilizing atmospheric elements and a broad range of dynamics and textures, Angell and company have created a sound that draws on the familiar and dares to go beyond the boundaries of roots music. Weaving together psychedelia, dream pop and a kind of dark funk that could only have come from the South, the Missionary Position reveals its strength with its frayed roots."

"...swampy, blues-based, soulful guitar rock with enough electronic ripples to lend it a menacing air. It's a modern take on blues, with the occasional haunting chorus in the background, minor chords, metronome-precise rhythms and an arms-open-wide attitude toward electronics, horns, woodwinds, keyboards and feedback. Add Angell's gritty vocals to the mix and the whole album is as dense as a warm front."

"...a blues-y, brooding and sex-crazed brand of rock that is infused with gutsy and gritty guitar riffs alongside a smooth saxophone, rhythmic synth lines, and dominant drum work. Frontman Jeff Angell reminds us all just how frontmen are supposed to be...demonstrating a bad-boy swagger highly reminiscent of Robert Plant in his early days."

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