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Ted Stevens and the Third Rail / Press

“Louisville-based Ted Stevens & The Third Rail (@tedstevensmusic) was like stepping into a time warp to the 1970s and that is a good thing. The Classic Rock trio is unlike anything Yours Truly has heard live since forever. Stevens pulled off the ultimate rock star outfit with a white polka dot shirt and leopard print sneakers. After the show, Stevens was clad in an awesome leather jacket oozing with uber charisma. Only in rock ‘n roll, people. Drummer Tony Gantt was solid behind the kit in a controlled frenzy and Kirk Kiefer was on point handling bass duties. The band’s catalog would be perfect for airplay on Columbus’ rock station Q-FM 96.3. “Hometown, Hometown” and “Live Forever” are two of the group’s best tracks performed and are available to listen to at their ReverbNation and Facebook pages. Here is hoping Ted Stevens & The Third Rail go on to have more success...”

“Louisville-based Ted Stevens & The Third Rail (@tedstevensmusic) was like stepping into a time warp to the 1970s and that is a good thing. The Classic Rock trio is unlike anything Yours Truly has heard live since forever. Stevens pulled off the ultimate rock star outfit with a white polka dot shirt and leopard print sneakers. After the show, Stevens was clad in an awesome leather jacket oozing with uber charisma. Only in rock ‘n roll, people. Drummer Tony Gantt was solid behind the kit in a controlled frenzy and Kirk Kiefer was on point handling bass duties. The band’s catalog would be perfect for airplay on Columbus’ rock station Q-FM 96.3. “Hometown, Hometown” and “Live Forever” are two of the group’s best tracks performed and are available to listen to at their ReverbNation and Facebook pages. Here is hoping Ted Stevens & The Third Rail go on to have more success out of Lousiville than the now-defunct Parlour Boys and local legend Peter Searcy, artists who did not se”

"The thing that attracted me to pop and rock music as kid was the sense that these songs could be about me or people I know or things that were going on. You could have a terrible day and turn on a song and it's saying everything you want to say about [your bad day]." "As an only child, I think I felt it was someone I could talk to, only it was records," he said. "I think I wanted to share and to communicate. To varying degrees we all kind of go through the same stuff. Maybe we don't know it all the time. A good song can kind of show you those threads, show you those ties. To do that, he said, is to play your songs in front of other people, and in the process to "give yourself away and see what you get back. "I'm not talking about applause," Stevens said. "I'm talking about something you may not see right away." And so it is when Stevens starts talking about music. This is a guy whose passion for his craft is evident around the clock – he truly seems to eat, drink and sleep music