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Space In Time / Press

“Father Time observing earth, scythe at hand while a galaxy swirls around his hourglass and fists? What could be more perfect for the cosmic, psychedelic, boogie hard rock within? Dave Bonds distilled the sound of this album into an image as striking as Space In Time's ability to take an older sound and give it new life in a voice of its own.”

Backbeat - Westword

“The show opened with Denver's Space in Time. Anyone who has seen the band before knows to expect excellent. But it sounded like Mike Atencio has been taking voice lessons or practicing a lot in the off-stage hours. He rocked back and forth and gestured dramatically in a way that is also effective for Ozzy Osbourne, but his control and expressiveness were exceptional even by his own high standards. The rest of the band synched perfectly in rhythm. You could see Javram Ciel-Tilton facing Yancy Green and Charly Miller, and that section of the band established a dynamic rhythm that worked perfectly with Atencio's phrasing and Vaughn McPherson's ghostly, yet bright, keyboard work. Yes, that early '70s hard rock sound was there, but Space in Time make it live and breathe today.”

Tom Murphy - Westword

“Another new local act for me was Denver’s own Space In Time. The band blasted through an impressive 70’s inspired set that covered proto-metal, hard rock, and doom in equal measures. The band was extremely tight and boasted some great, powerful vocals. To top things off the band dug deep into some nuggets and played a cover of Sir Lord Baltimore’s “Helium Head (I Got A Love)” and they killed it. Space In Time’s high energy set broke up the night nicely. Looking forward to catching this four-piece again.”

Steve Miller - Temple of Perdition

“There's a bit of stylistic time travel happening on Rock and Roll, Space in Time's newest release. The keyboards and guitar, for instance, play off one another in a clear nod to the likes of Captain Beyond and Uriah Heep. But instead of merely mining the usual classic-hard-rock territory, these guys write simple melodies delivered with power and nuance. "Passage of Time" is an especially strong track, with its instrumentation woven together as though part of a narrative instead of just a song. Mike Atencio's sophisticated lyrics imbue everything with a poetic sensibility that's informed by his having learned hard life lessons without becoming hardened in the process. Unscarred by the tropes typical of this subgenre, Space in Time has delivered an album whose title is accurate rather than an attempt to be clever.”

Tom Murphy - Westword

“If you spend your time flipping through old stacks of moldy vinyl in shithole record stores just hoping you will find that lost Sir Lord Baltimore or Uriah Heep wax you have been missing, then this is for you. I made the point when I reviewed their last full length to say that is that this is not Stoner Rock, not even close. What this is, is five musicians born 40 years too late playing their hearts out, pushing each other and pushing their own envelopes. You can tell by the texture of the songs on their second release that “Space” has really started to come into their own. The heavy Deep Purple and Blue Oyster Cult influences are still prevalent but Space In Time has definitely made a stance with their own unique groove.”

Attucks - ThrashPunx

“This is their second full length release and from what I understand they have another one in the oven, due out next year I hope. That is a sign of a band feeling their moment, a band that enjoys jamming regardless of what is happening around them. Which is highlighted in the title track Rock and Roll, you can’t help but sing along to it. Mike experiments with different vocal melodies, cool backing harmonies and with some studio trickery on this release. Reading through the lyrics and listening to the band you quickly see that every song has been crafted with care and without the thought of any of the songs being considered filler. The album kicks off with a ripping Yancy drum roll and it’s all over from there, Javram’s wicked leads and killer riffs added to Charlie’s bass lines and Vaughn’s organ licks make for a very memorable piece of wax.”

Attucks - ThrashPunx

“Oh, and the U.F.O. cover is on the money, Javram is all over creepy Michael Schenker’s licks (Michael is creepy not his licks) and executes them with justice. I am really glad that Space decided to release this on vinyl, you can get the C.D. too but I like having the record. When you see these guys live you begin to understand what makes this group so special. They make you feel like you are seeing something important, no matter the crowd; Space In Time turns them into fans. Proving that you don’t need to tune down and sing like a Cookie Monster to shred faces off, all you need is some real Rock And Roll. As the lyric says Space In Time is the name and Rock and Roll is the game!”

Attucks - ThrashPunx

“Take a trip back to ’70s guitar rock with Space In Time. In the 1970s, listeners knew exactly what to expect when tuning in to rock radio: hot guitar riffs and a lead singer with remarkable range. Even the ballads had the requisite blistering guitar solo. Unlike today, 70s rock was almost formulaic, and it had to be a comfort knowing what to expect. The lyrics were shallow and full of cliches, but the show — man, the show. There is no modern equivalent to Van Halen. Judging from “Smoke and Mirrors,” the first single on the band’s new album, “Rock and Roll”, Denver’s Space In Time is a band that plays homage to this era without irony. The guitars are heavy, a la Black Sabbath, and the lead singer has an operatic falsetto that’s a near-perfect Axl Rose, who was not around in the 70s but channels Steven Tyler during that era. Add to this mix an ominous organ, and you’re transported back. Pure 70s rock. Surely, in keeping with the 70s formula, this band must kick some a”

Josh Johnson - Denver Post Reverb

“This beauty jumps right off with the “hook” and delivers straight epic jams. I could see how less educated people would lump this band in with the stoner metal sound. The pure lack of stoner metal is what makes this disc jam. This style of rock creeps up from the foggy under belly of the early seventies. Pre -metal, some might say. My 7th grade art teacher referred to it as acid rock. Straight from the roots this is grown. With obvious influences such as MOUNTAIN, DEEP PURPLE and RAINBOW. This could have been easily released in 73′. We even get the treat of hearing a great cover of URIAH HEEP’s classic’ Easy Living’ off of Demons and Wizards. These guys even have that blaring, raging organ sound that dances back and forth with the guitarist’s catchy leads, reminiscent of Lord and Blackmore all the fucking way!”

Attucks - ThrashHead

“Each song really stands out and you can hear the influences as you go. The first song brings to mind DUST if a throatier Ian Gillian was singing, where the next is more evil and darker ala BLUE OYSTER CULT. Great tempo changes with cool breakdowns and nice twists and the flow is signature of that old pre metal style. The fact is, those old bands tried really hard to be good and show off their talents when they got a chance to do a record. Rarely if ever do I hear bands bring it like this anymore. Cool guitar solos, banging drum fills, actual singing and that fucking killer organ. Bad ass! One of my favorites is ‘Sea Worthy’, I swear Ronnie James Dio wrote the lyrics to this one.”

Attucks - ThrashHead

“Great cover art depicting the story of life and time. These guys hail from Denver and the locals know them from all the other projects they have been in over the years. I wouldn’t believe it if you told me that some of these guys play grindcore in their spare time but if you get the c.d. you won’t know anything about the band at all. No thanks list or who plays what, just lyrics over weird blurry pictures. The only real down fall to this recording is the fact that I have to listen to it on c.d. and not on wax, where it belongs!!! Well, I don’t care how cliché it is, this one is what I have blasting during my morning bong toke session. I really look forward to hearing more from these mile high masters of rock.”

Attucks - ThrashHead

“It should come as no surprise that this band did a cover of Uriah Heep's classic "Easy Livin'" from, appropriately enough, 1972's Demons and Wizards. What is surprising is that Space in Time's version is superior to W.A.S.P.'s 1986 take on the same song. Sure, this collection of tunes might make you revisit your old Rainbow albums or take a trip back to Deep Purple's Made in Japan, but it does so because there are no lazy, subpar licks or performances to be found. A lot of modern groups try to cop the feel and tone of '70s rock, but most lack the chops and imagination to make it convincing. In contrast, Space in Time has psychedelic hard rock oozing from its pores. No irony, no poseur stances struck — just solid, heavy rock and roll, beginning to end.”

Tom Murphy - Westword

“A night of exceptionally interesting hard rock that ended with Pentagram began with the new-look Space in Time. They were surprisingly confident and assured. The band's new singer, Mike, sounded like a young Ozzy Osbourne during the verses, and on the choruses he wailed away on the high notes like Ian Gillan. More than ever, the act has integrated R&B and psychedelia into its hard rock sound and Mike's soulful singing is very much a part of that transformation. Vaughn's keyboard work was also stellar. Really, there's no dead weight in Space in Time. The guys played with an enthusiasm to match the eager crowd and won at least some of them over. Sure, these guys aren't breaking new ground. But they also don't sound like they're trying to be a band from another era, which is not something a lot of their sonic brethren can say. The aesthetic may be classic but the execution is here and now. Closing with a cover of Deep Purple's "Fireball," the revamped Space in Time left on a high note”

Tom Murphy - Westword

“This EP opens with "Deep Hole on a Gold Throne," which sounds a bit like Dio if Michael Schenker had been his guitarist and the fantasy-fiction imagery didn't come off as melodramatic and adolescent. Inevitably this band and this release will invite the term "stoner rock," but there's nothing sludgy or absurdly exaggerated about any of these songs. For a hard-rock album, each track is refreshingly succinct without skimping on the right type of dramatics that made that kind of music fun in the first place. Sure, all the excesses you've come to expect from a heavy rock album are here — the tasty solos and menacing dynamics — but Space in Time manages to add them without boring us or embarrassing itself with its bombast.”

Tom Murphy - Westword

“Any time you feel like you've stepped through a door to another era at a show, it's usually because the band on stage is perpetrating a hopelessly retro musical crime against the audience. Contemporary heavy music is especially guilty of this. But once in a while a group will embody well-worn influences so deftly that it takes the sound in interesting directions. Space in Time (due at the Larimer Lounge on Saturday, January 10) is one such band, though it's clearly the spawn of latter-day hard-rock acts like Rainbow, Deep Purple and Humble Pie. However, this act has also learned more than a few tricks from more recent heroes of guitar rock like Kyuss and Sleep. The result is a surprisingly forceful and melodic brand of rock and roll welcome in an era when attention to songcraft is too often lacking.”

Tom Murphy - Westword

“Space In Time had the middle slot, and I didn’t know what to expect. The band’s sound was reminiscent of a weird mixture of Black Sabbath, Deep Purple and Free. Fortunately, these guys seem to have learned, however, that it’s not enough to worship at the feet of your artistic forebears. The music had its edges but it also came off more melodic than murky. The singer seemed to be feeling the lyrics without having to force any rocking out. And the rest of the members played with a similar emotional honesty. A lot of bands inspired by ’70s hard rock seem to put on a pose, but there was no fakery with Space In Time, and that threw me off in a good way. The act’s set closed with a song that had a middle section clearly grounded in a jazzy R&B and yet it didn’t sound out of place in an otherwise hard rock song —truly a testament to this band’s talent.”

Dave Herrera - Westword Blogs