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Riviera / Press

“Alt-country band Riviera left Chicago—understandably, as that city has many, many other alt-country bands—and made the move to Portland, where there are no alt-country bands. Oh, I kid. Actually, the term "alt-country" unfairly boils down Riviera—who, yes, have their share of twang and strum and high, lonesome harmonizing, but also have depth in each of their songs, telling fairly involved stories in plain and appealingly uncomplicated ways. Their Watching Western Skies EP is an impressive introduction to these new Portlanders, offering ditties both pretty and nitty-gritty.”

“i was and still am a huge fan of their 05 release at the end of the american century and contains one of my favorite songs of the past ten years, “your american past.” during their stint in chicago they opened for the likes of tweedy, son volt, califone, etc… if these guys trust the men of riviera, shouldnt you? definitely loving the new song…”

“Rainin’ sideways They got all growed up in windy Chicago, but Riviera has relocated to rainy Portland where their Americana folk rock is just what the doctor ordered whenever our various rivers overflow. The band features Derek Phillips on guitar, vocals, harmonica and piano; Mick Radichel on guitar and vocals; Jeff Porter on pedal steel, dobro, mandolin and guitar; Robert Finn on bass; and Paul DeMichele on drums. Riviera plows in the same fields cut by Wilco, the Jayhawks and other y’all-ternative types, and boasts a rich, full sound that will ease your mind even as she tells you it’s not you, it’s her. ”

“Riviera has now added a whole slew of sounds to that basic template. There are definite hints of Sixties Britpop on tracks like “Unsatisfied”, some classic rock guitar work and more than a hint of a southern drawl in the vocals. There are some great lyrics here too, like “Your American Past”’s opening couplet “The great American disco revival/will be held at 2.23”. This album feels like quintessential American music, stamped out of that classic template that encompasses everything from the Band to Ryan Adams.”

“Classic Americana in the early Wilco style. Now, failure to mention Wilco in a Riviera review will get you thrown out of the guild, so there you go. And yes, there is a resemblance, to how Wilco might have been if they?d expanded on their ?Being There? approach a bit more and not gone hurtling off into the post-rock arena. But, whereas on the Broken Hearted Dreams EP that was all there was, Riviera has now added a whole slew of sounds to that basic template. There are definite hints of Sixties Britpop on tracks like ?Unsatisfied?, some classic rock guitar work and more than a hint of a southern drawl in the vocals. There are some great lyrics here too, like ?Your American Past??s opening couplet ?The great American disco revival/will be held at 2.23?. This album feels like quintessential American music, stamped out of that classic template that encompasses everything from the Band to Ryan Adams.”

Americana-UK

“Riviera's full-length debut is pervaded by a sense of nostalgia and uncertainty. The album turns a critical eye to the detached cool with which many of us conduct our lives; filling the spaces with work, dreams, drinking or some other noise. But while there is a cynical underpinning to the album, there is also a certain amount of naivet?-a feeling that there was innocence lost along the way, but not so lost it cannot be regained. There is an understated beauty in the sentiments expressed on the album brought out by the hushed tone of the songs. Melodic piano lines, countrified drums and guitar playing that ranges from obvious to obscure are the backbone of this quiet Americana record. ”

DAVE BRECHEISEN - ONTAP Online

“ "Petrified Possessions" mixes a Wilco feel with a Hammond B3 organ, and is a throwback musically to an age that predates this band. "Somebody's Fool" opens with a Kinks riff, then employs a Mick Jagger/Elvis Costello vocal. "In the Stands" is a more open tribute to the Rolling Stones, while "Ashes on the Moon" sounds like Crazy Horse (Neil Young) being fronted by Jeff Tweedy (Wilco). "Stranded" tips its hat to Pink Floyd's "Comfortably Numb," and the entire record just makes you glad that the next generation still has some music fans astute enough to check out something that was released over five years ago. _At the End of the American Century?_ is a timeless record, fitting in well alongside your CSNY, Rolling Stones, Wilco, or Vigilantes of Love records. Someone with a large bankroll and access to radio play could make this band very, very famous. ”

Brian A. Smith - Phantom Tollbooth

“We were fans of the band’s first record, where you could practically hear the blood, sweat and tears that went into bringing it to life. Capital offers similar moments of quiet reflection (“Everything You Know,” “Dreams”) but overall this is a step forward for the band as they’ve thrown off the yoke of their influences, and created a less self-conscious record that isn’t afraid to offer up a foot-stomper like “Giving Blood” or make it plain that “sympathy don’t mean that much to me” (“Sympathy”).”

Chicagoist

“Gapers Block Review of Capital For the friend upset that Wilco hasn't released another Being There: Capital by Riviera It's pretty easy to categorize Riviera as alt-country and Americana, especially since they hail from Chicago and sometimes have a bit of twang. On Capital, the band does borrow from the aforementioned genres, but also channels a wide range of rock-related music. For instance, there is a lot of power-pop in with the splendid harmonies and raw riffs that carry the album. Frontman Derek Phillips leads listeners through some of the best driving music of the year, especially "Snails." ”

-James Ziegenfus - Gaper's Block