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PROTEST / Press

“Finally, someone gets the thrash/metalcore ratio right, which means as little metalcore as possible. It’s still in there, but PROTEST manage to drop the temp regulary without heading down to Breakdown City. Plus their lyrics seem to be about stuff besides getting revenge on shit talkers or fake people or whatever.”

Decibel magazine

“Based on the full-length, this act provides intense classic thrash with some hardcore tendencies. The guys thrash with conviction adding the necessary stomping break ("Fueled by Hate"; the pensive, quasi-doomy "White Noise"), but you'll have to run cover on the more aggressive, death metal-laced numbers ("Prophet$"). In the 2nd half the speed gets diminished, even a few battle-like touches ("Blood and Sand"), in the spirit of Bolt Thrower, can be caught to a positive effect. Short, more immediate and more aggressive cuts come near the end, where the bridled Slayer-esque aggression ("War Dance Black", "Kill Craft") is hard to be dusguised, even by the very stylish melodic leads. "Turning Tide" is a furious thrash/deathster, closing the album in a shattering fashion, moshing without mercy to the end. The singer is a lower-pitched hardcore-ish semi-shouter, whose angry antics fit the aggressive music quite well.”

Bounded By Metal

“THE CORRUPTION CODELet’s talk about a band right in our own backyard that has just put out a blistering new CD called The Corruption Code. The fourteen track effort finds Protest at their relentlessly seething best. Featuring a stellar recording by the fine team at Skyline Studios this razor sharp spark of rapid fire aggression is remarkably impressive. Not only do Protest pen some potent verbal scathe they also avoid sounding too much like their obvious influences. Shortly after opener “The Fall Of Man” storms out the gate Slayer immediately springs to mind but it quickly becomes very clear that Protest isn’t following anybody else’s lead.  Things rarely get tedious as they hammer through their barbed-wire whiplash. Protest has managed to capture an explosive energy here that absolutely represents what they’re like live. Hopefully they’ll be playing around town again soon.”

Lit Monthly