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Larry Turner / Comments

Fifty Stakes
Fifty Stakes  (over 3 years ago)

BLESSED LOVE AND RESPECT KEEP ON KEEPIN ON

Andrea Nardello
Andrea Nardello  (almost 4 years ago)

Cool songs!

The Pizza Kings
The Pizza Kings  (almost 4 years ago)

Hey Larry glad you showed up on our friends list on Myspace. Enjoyed your new song "A Demon In That Lady (studio version)", very nicely done, the lyrics are great. This song sounds like the way good music use to be done. We were happy to become fans on ReverbNation and give you some support, we'll definitely need to return and listen to all your tunes soon. In the meantime we hope you can drop by our page and check out some of our work... we can all use the support. Thanks so much - The Pizza Kings

Payton Taylor
Payton Taylor  (about 4 years ago)

Hey Larry! Thanks so much for becoming a fan! Great originals - love the lyrics!! :) And we're practically neighbors... I'm right over the bridge from Philly... hope I get to see you live someday soon! Best of luck and thanks again! -Payton Taylor <3

Donna Sweeney
Donna Sweeney  (over 4 years ago)

Loving your originals, Larry! Keep 'em coming!! Much respect and appreciation from Daytona.

Larry Turner
Larry Turner  (over 4 years ago)

May 31, 2010
Exploring Music’s Hold on the Mind
By CLAUDIA DREIFUS
From The New York Times
Three years ago, when Oxford University Press published “Music, Language, and the Brain,” Oliver Sacks described it as “a major synthesis that will be indispensable to neuroscientists.” The author of that volume, Aniruddh D. Patel, a 44-year-old senior fellow at the Neurosciences Institute in San Diego, was in New York City in May. We spoke over coffee for more than an hour and later by telephone. An edited and condensed version of the conversations follows.
Q. YOU DESCRIBE YOURSELF AS A NEUROSCIENTIST OF MUSIC. THIS HAS TO BE A NEW PROFESSION. HOW DID YOU COME TO IT?
A. I’ve been passionate about two things since childhood — science and music. At graduate school, Harvard, I hoped to combine the two.
But studying with E.O. Wilson, I quite naturally got caught up with ants. In 1990, I found myself in Australia doing fieldwork on ants for a Ph.D. thesis. And there, I had this epiphany: the only thing I really wanted to do was study the biology of how humans make and process music.
I wondered if the drive to make it was innate, a product of our evolution, as Darwin had speculated. Did we have a special neurobiological capacity for music, as we do for language and grammar? So from Australia, I wrote Wilson that there was no way I could continue with ants. Amazingly, he wrote: “You must follow your passion. Come back to Harvard, and we’ll give it a shot.”
Wilson and Evan Balaban, a birdsong biologist who taught me about the neurobiology of auditory communication, mentored me through my thesis, which was called “A Biological Study of the Relationship Between Language and Music.” When I defended it in 1996, this was unusual scholarship. The neurobiology of music wasn’t yet a recognized field.

Gerry Pearson
Gerry Pearson  (over 4 years ago)

Love your Originality! Sounds that come straight from your soul!

Larry Turner
Larry Turner  (over 4 years ago)

PhillyOriginalMusic@yahoogroups.com - A spot to search for Philadelphia area original music makers.