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The Fly Kingdom / Blog

Gipsy Rose

I originally posted this on My Space April 21st but I also wanted to share it here:

Last Sunday I was watching a foreign (German) movie whose title roughly translates to "Gloomy Sunday" (Ein Lied von Liebe und Tod). I looked it up on IMDB and this is what the plot the movie is about in a nut shell...

"Budapest in the thirties. The restaurant owner Laszlo hires the pianist András to play in his restaurant. Both men fall in love with the beautiful waitress Ilona who inspires András to his only composition. His song of Gloomy Sunday is, at first, loved and then feared, for its melancholic melody triggers off a chain of suicides. The fragile balance of the erotic ménage à trois is sent off kilter when the German Hans goes and falls in love with Ilona as well."

Well, after watching it I did a search and found this on wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gloomy_Sunday

In short the pianist wrote a song that made people commit suicide. But the thing (if you watch the movie) is that he writes it before she falls for him, so the song is actually about unrequited love... so the sorrow he feels is what he, in turn makes as music....

all that being said, the mood of the movie and the fact that music, a song could spark such strong emotions, I was inspired to look at making a song about "what you can't have". Yes, I that was the meaning of "Sweet Blue Thornless Rose" but what wasn't there was the Classical, Romantic Era feel that a East meets west could have... the impact of re-making Beethoven meets chopin on the sitar...

So to me the song Gipsy Rose will about unrequited love because either A)the feeling is not mutual or B)as the song title describes the person keeps moving around whether it's from place to place or heart to heart...

However looking even deeper, it also expands to any desire that hasn't been met yet... either because of things that get in the way or mindset that says it can't be fullfilled...

I was working with the "Gloomy Sunday" melody while playing my Ragas this morning... so the accompaniment could be either eastern or western... But in the end it will express the meaning, the feeling, the emotion described.

The actual title will be in Sanskrit, vaGka paaTla, which roughly translates to Gipsy Rose...