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Oak Creek / Press

“Something about Daniel and Jenna Watters of Oak Creek Band fame is hard to identify; not a combination of words or button presses does it justice. Their music feels good. It’s caressing, communicative, warm, mindful and fragile. They are webbed in a world of truth, wonder and encompass a timeless spirit that’s inline with the geometrical shapes that form in nature.”

“Intelligent, appealing rock with good writing and attractive vocals can still be found, but it definitely seems to have gone out of fashion on the commercial music pop scene, where robotic vocals and monumentally dumb lyrics are the norm. There are quite a few retro band carrying on the melodic pop tradition, many of them harkening back to a specific time periods and readily showing their source of influence. This week, we have the debut full-length album by a group that also specializes in well-written, high quality attractive rock and pop with an excellent male/female vocal pair. They call themselves The Oak Creek Band, and their new CD is titled XI, not for the number of previous albums, of which there were only some shorter-length EPs, but presumably for the number of songs on the new recording. Some critics who are quoted in the band's publicity material draw a parallel to late 1970s rock along the lines of Fleetwood Mac of that period, but The Oak Creek Band has a bit more...”

"Their whimsical sound moved people out of their seats and onto the floor. The music has an old charm and a timeless allure. The Oak Creek Band writes beautiful songs with telling lyrics. Their music is a window into their lives and their beauty and love exudes from the stage. As the singers look into each other’s eyes, a spark of hope glows. Their soulful performance feels personal, as if they are singing for this specific audience, to each person there. The music’s bluesy sound with a touch of twang is the right mix for those who are not fond of country music, but love folksy tunes. When the band covered Led Zeppelin’s What is and What Should Never Be, the crowd went crazy. This song showed off the true vocal power of the lead singer, Jenna Watters. Hearing this song in the middle of their soft and flowing set was a blast to the face — in a good way. After more original songs with their signature sound, the band closed with “Oh Darling” by the Beatles."

Laura Thompson - The Lumberjack

"I was expecting The Oak Creek Band to be a contemporary indie folk band, but their performance incorporated a range of styles. They managed to present the wide range of music in a coherent performance package that came off as a polished showcase of their versatility rather than a jumble of songs that hinted at a lack of identity. The Oak Creek Band definitely has a hold of their identity, even if that identity isn't something that can be easily categorized.. understands how to craft and deliver melody driven music through strong lead vocal work from Jenna and Daniel...understand the dynamic between each other and the personality that each of their voices contain. Jenna Watters has a powerful, deep-reaching soulful voice that brings oomph to the bands sound when necessary, while Daniel Watters has an emotive yet earnest sound that brings about a more introspective sound. The sometimes alternating lead and sometimes co-vocal dynamic of these two provide the framework of the band."

Peter Washington - Concerted Effort Blog

"Based on the crowd size and their connection to the music, The Oak Creek Band was who people came out to see. The band’s name evokes thoughts of country and roots rock, and although there were bits of both, it was not in the rowdy or rough and tumble way I had envisioned. What I heard was more refined late seventies rock that at times reminded me of mainstream Fleetwood Mac. Their music also had a transcendental feel, and hints of new age spirituality. I love surprises, and this was a sound that that had an identity all its own.The harmony filled vocals were laced with pop and soul, and the lyrics were thoughtfully meaningful. This band seems to want to connect with fans on a deeper level, and the fans seemed to want to reciprocate. The Oak Creek Band’s music is highly energetic, especially when their indie rock side comes out, but it is also surprisingly soothing."

Brian Turk - Listen Up Denver

“I t's another Last Chance To See. This time, it's the Oak Creek edition. The Denver (by way of Arizona) band is checking out after four years on the Colorado scene. The Americana quartet has released two records and played all over the state. Now, they're headed for Nashville, Tenn., where the band thinks its music will better fit the audience."We've been here for four years and it's time for something new," singer and guitarist Jenna Watters said. "We love it here, but it's not really the music scene that we think we can thrive in. It's doing what we need to do." The band started out deep in Americana and folk traditions, and even though Watters thinks they sound better live than on a record, the band felt they weren't putting on the kind of show Coloradans love. Specifically, the multi-hour jam extravaganzas that do so well here. Read more: http://www.coloradodaily.com/music-news/ci_22387057/farewell-oak-creek?IADID=Search-www.coloradodaily.com-www.coloradodaily.com#ixzz2IGTwiFUX”

“I have to say, this show was way beyond my expectations. I have seen a few “tribute” shows this year that involved groups of musicians playing another artists songs, and although they were all great, this one took the cake for me. The musicianship was stellar across the board and there was a natural flow to the night. These guys may play with different bands, but they sure were on the same page on Friday. So, just who were the daring musicians who took on the task of recreating the songs of the most successful band to have every graced the planet? Well, it all started with Oak Creek who simply go bonkers for The Beatles. They realized if they were going to “cover” songs of this caliber they better bring their A-game and invite the best musicians they know to join in on the celebration.”

“Apparently those writing sessions were fruitful as they led to songs like “1934,” “Golden Cities,” and “Weight Of The World” from the group’s self-titled debut EP, which deftly walks the line between ethereal folk and funky indie rock. It’s a tough line to toe but Oak Creek does it with a practiced ear that is mature beyond their years. “That first CD is very eclectic. Some of it’s funk, some of it’s folk, it’s just kind of all over,” Watters admitted before turning his attention to the group’s more recent EP that was released in May. “Fingerprints is very consistent in style but it’s a little more melodramatic, not as upbeat and poppy. Both were kind of explorations, and the songs we’re writing right now are kind of in between. Our last album was very epic. I don’t think we meant it to be that way, but looking back, it’s a pretty heavy record.” Heavy or not, it’s a very solid collection of music that has led the group to start thinking more”

“Their whimsical sound moved people out of their seats and onto the floor. The music has an old charm and a timeless allure. The Oak Creek Band writes beautiful songs with telling lyrics. Their music is a window into their lives and their beauty and love exudes from the stage. As the singers look into each other’s eyes, a spark of hope glows. Their soulful performance feels personal, as if they are singing for this specific audience, to each person there. The music’s bluesy sound with a touch of twang is the right mix for those who are not fond of country music, but love folksy tunes. When the band covered Led Zeppelin’s What is and What Should Never Be, the crowd went crazy. This song showed off the true vocal power of the lead singer, Jenna Watters. Hearing this song in the middle of their soft and flowing set was a blast to the face — in a good way. After more original songs with their signature sound, the band closed with “Oh Darling” by the Beatles.”

“On the Oak Creek Band's sophomore release, the six-song Fingerprints, the group sets a relaxed tone with "I Want You Around," which gradually ramps up in verve without quite crossing over into rock-anthem territory. Part of the EP's charm is that, for the most part, it's a cozy affair that doesn't stray far from the '60s-inspired pop of Autumn Defense or '80s-era Fleetwood Mac, with cuts like "2012 (Quetzalcoatl)" and "Penelope." The act is fronted by Daniel and Jenna Watters, who formed it in 2009 after moving to Colorado from Sedona, Arizona. While Jenna does a stellar job on lead vocals and Daniel provides harmonies throughout most of the disc, he takes the lead on the closing track, "Barefoot Baby."”

"Last night at the Hi Dive I met Karen and Alexis. The two are devoted fans of Oak Creek, the band I was there to see. When Karen discovered this, she gushed about the last Oak Creek show she had seen in Aspen a little over a year ago. In fact, she quoted the lyrics to their song “1934“; which sparked my interests, as I have yet to meet fans at a show who display such enthusiasm. When I came back Oak Creek was just about ready to go. She’s got a bit of a Spektor look to her; but Jenna Watter’s smile would blow Regina’s out of the water any day. Jenna and Daniel aren’t just married on paper; it’s a vocal arrangement too. I looked around and saw dudes dancing. I mean, they were really getting down! Is it possible to dance and write? Nope. So, I abandoned the pen and kept up with the audience. Down in the basement at the Hi Dive... the interview goes more like a conversation would. There’s no awkward silences. Everything just flows."

Courtney Nichole Boutwell - G to C Magazine

“Based on the crowd size and their connection to the music, The Oak Creek Band was who people came out to see. When they hit the stage, their sound was not at all what I was expecting. The band’s name evokes thoughts of country and roots rock, and although there were bits of both, it was not in the rowdy or rough and tumble way I had envisioned. What I heard was more refined late seventies rock that at times reminded me of “My Baby Takes The Morning Train” or mainstream Fleetwood Mac. Their music also had a transcendental feel, and hints of new age spirituality. I love surprises, and this was a sound that that had an identity all its own.The harmony filled vocals were laced with pop and soul, and the lyrics were thoughtfully meaningful. This band seems to want to connect with fans on a deeper level, and the fans seemed to want to reciprocate. The Oak Creek Band’s music is highly energetic, especially when their indie rock side comes out, but it is also surprisingly soothing.”

“The Oak Creek Band has been flying under the radar since forming in September of 2009. ...add that the band played at the Daytime Emmy Awards in Los Angeles this past year. Come on Denver, this band’s sitting in your back yard and the masses in L.A. are already on board with them?...Once entrenched in the local music scene they began crafting their brand of what we’ll call ‘indie throwback roots rock.'..."we do get asked to play at bluegrass festivals, but that’s not what we’re doing,” explains Daniel. Adds Jenna, "we’re more of a rock-n-roll show live, but we’re not a sex and drugs and rock-n-roll band. We want to portray a positive persona as a group"... If you haven’t heard the bands self-titled six-song debut...It showcases the band’s talents nicely, and gives you a nice feel for what this outfit’s potential is...I asked the band, Why the Denver area to get an act together? Paul said. “The people in Denver really like good music. It wasn’t a hard decision.”

“Last night at the Hi Dive I met Karen and Alexis. The two are devoted fans of Oak Creek, the band I was there to see. When Karen discovered this, she gushed about the last Oak Creek show she had seen in Aspen a little over a year ago. In fact, she quoted the lyrics to their song “1934“; which sparked my interests, as I have yet to meet fans at a show who display such enthusiasm. When I came back Oak Creek was just about ready to go. She’s got a bit of a Spektor look to her; but Jenna Watter’s smile would blow Regina’s out of the water any day. Jenna and Daniel aren’t just married on paper; it’s a vocal arrangement too. I looked around and saw dudes dancing. I mean, they were really getting down! Is it possible to dance and write? Nope. So, I abandoned the pen and kept up with the audience. Down in the basement at the Hi Dive... the interview goes more like a conversation would. There’s no awkward silences. Everything just flows.”

“I was expecting The Oak Creek Band to be a contemporary indie folk band, but their performance incorporated a range of styles. They managed to present the wide range of music in a coherent performance package that came off as a polished showcase of their versatility rather than a jumble of songs that hinted at a lack of identity. The Oak Creek Band definitely has a hold of their identity, even if that identity isn't something that can be easily categorized.. understands how to craft and deliver melody driven music through strong lead vocal work from Jenna and Daniel...understand the dynamic between each other and the personality that each of their voices contain. Jenna Watters has a powerful, deep-reaching soulful voice that brings oomph to the bands sound when necessary, while Daniel Watters has an emotive yet earnest sound that brings about a more introspective sound. The sometimes alternating lead and sometimes co-vocal dynamic of these two provide the framework of the band.”

“While there was great music around every corner, one act really stood out to me, the “Oak Creak Band,” from Denver, Colorado. This 6-member ensemble captivated my attention for a good 4-5 songs, all of which were their own tunes I believe. I noticed that they were hocking some merchandise, including CDs, so I purchased one for the ride home. The CD, entitled: “The Oak Creek Band,” only has six songs on it, but I listened to them all…twice! The music has a distinct and diverse sound. One tune had a hint of reggae, while another with a subtle flair for disco…the others had a folksy rock sound. I’m a huge music fan, but by no means am I a music critic…I just know good music when I hear it and think you should have a listen if you enjoy being introduced to new talent. Have a look at the video clip I put together from last night… You can also listen to their latest tune by clicking the “play” button below, or visiting OakCreekBand.com for more info.”

“The Oak Creek Band is the musical phenomena that so many music lovers dig and dig for, scouring the depths of the internet hoping to stumble upon it. Rare like a total solar eclipse where totality only exists along a narrow path, this band is one of the independent music world's total solar eclipses. I had a very difficult time picking a favorite song to write about. After combing through every single song 2x.... Musically, the band's talent and cohesiveness are unmistakably brilliant and I do believe that The Oak Creek Band has several hit songs on their hands, all they need is a great marketing plan and budget. This EP is by far, the best folk project I've heard from any indie folk band. Each track has a unique heartbeat and is well worth spending money on. If other bands want to know what timeless music sounds like, listen to The Oak Creek Band because you can't put a date on great songs. If I was a record exec, they'd besigned to my label!”

“A Sedona band had a homecoming Oct. 18, playing the Sedona Performing Arts Center for students of Sedona Red Rock High School. The Oak Creek Band is fronted by two SRRHS alumni, Daniel Watters and Jenna Cunningham. Make that Jenna Watters now, as the former classmates, longtime friends and current bandmates got married Sept. 10 at Indian Gardens Park in Oak Creek Canyon. The band’s tour served as a working honeymoon. They worked their way from San Francisco to San Diego before turning east to Phoenix, Flagstaff and Sedona. The Oak Creek Band plays an eclectic mix of alternative, indie rock and folk with heavily lyrical lines, but also has songs that dip into funk and border on bluegrass. The band played for Sedona Red Rock High School’s fifth period in a concert set up by humanities teacher Karyl Goldsmith. “It was a lot better response than we were anticipating,” Jenna Watters said. “I remember that we used to heckle all the acts that came through. But we got a good response”

“Daniel Watters and Jenna Cunningham from The Oak Creek Band were married on Saturday, Sept. 10, and want to share their love with Sedona. They will be performing a show at the Martini Bar, 1350 W. 89A in Sedona, on Friday, Sept. 23, at 6 p.m. Part of the proceeds from this show will go to benefit 20-year-old Sedona resident, Amanda Coughlin, who is fighting a rare form of liver cancer. Since touring around the southwest twice already this year and playing a Daytime Emmy Awards Banquet in downtown L.A. in June, Oak Creek has been preparing for their "Honey Moon" tour in September and October. It will be a celebration of the marriage between founding Oak Creek members, Jenna Cunningham and Daniel Watters. The six piece Americana/Rock band based out of Denver, CO has been spreading their amazing musical talent across the southwest in true grass roots fashion, sharing their message of love with classic song writing, high energy performances and synergistic harmonies. ”

“Originally from Arizona, but in Denver since 2009, The Oak Creek Band may be releasing its “debut” but it’s hardly a new project. The band compares themselves to ’70s soft rock bands, but truth be told, they’re more modern than they think. Simultaneously indie and folky, with poppy choruses, the band nails a very fun album, even in its most tear-provoking elements. Also amazing is the ample use of Denver musicians who guest appear on the release, from members of Yamn!, Toad King, and Oakhurst. The transplants have obviously done a wonderful job entrenching themselves in the local scene.”

“Young love is tough material to tackle. The radio is filled with artists who are fluent in sex, lust, and hormone-riddled attraction (the latter bringing a certain teen heartthrob to mind)… but not many know how to speak of companionship. On their brand new self-titled EP, The Oak Creek Band demonstrates a deep understanding of what it means to be young, poor, and in love. Perhaps that is because that is the world recently-engaged band members Jenna Cunningham and Daniel Watters have been facing since moving from California and Arizona to Denver, Colorado to fine tune their music. As vocalist Jenna Cunningham sings in the opening track, 1934, “We had our love to keep us warm.” Through it’s six songs, the EP has it’s share of love and loss. 1934 expresses not only a young, survivalist love (with the kind of lyrics that will make you want spend the day holding your beloved under blankets) but the spoiling of this love when wealth and life become easier...”

“Originally from Arizona, but in Denver since 2009, The Oak Creek Band may be releasing its “debut” but it’s hardly a new project. The band compares themselves to ’70s soft rock bands, but truth be told, they’re more modern than they think. Simultaneously indie and folky, with poppy choruses, the band nails a very fun album, even in its most tear-provoking elements. Also amazing is the ample use of Denver musicians who guest appear on the release, from members of Yamn!, Toad King, and Oakhurst. The transplants have obviously done a wonderful job entrenching themselves in the local scene.”

“I had the lovely opportunity to see Oak Creek perform for their recent record release at Walnut Room on Friday night. The lead singer, Jenna Cunningham, is way too cute and has such a soothing voice. Her boyfriend, Daniel Watters, is kind of her back up and plays bass. Or another type of guitar. Whatever, he dances and plays music and gazes at Jenna while she's singing. Get this - they've been making music (and probably makin' out) since they were in high school. Sweet. Definitely go check them out if you're in Denver...or anywhere in the southwest, apparently: "tour dates for the southwest are currently being scheduled for early spring with stops in southern Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico and California." ”

“There’s a good chance that I’m going to check out the Oak Creek Band in the coming weeks. I’m absolutely sure of that. It’s actually kind of funny how I found this local Denver band–I was searching for Wye Oak tickets. Wye Oak doesn’t come until April but I think listening to Oak Creek’s easy folk tunes will help to pass the time. While Oak Creek is a Denver band in my book, Daniel Watters and Jenna Cunningham are originally from Sedona, Arizona. Over time, they came together to finally form a band. It wasn’t until they were in Denver that that formed Oak Creek. Their poppy folk sound helped to draw some comparisons to Stars by others and I can hear it a bit. However, I always, rightly or wrongly, associate Stars more closely with Arcade Fire and in this case Oak Creek is the other direction. They are simpler, less sonically indulgent. I think that’s why I enjoy them so much. They are currently recording their first album together. Check out 1934.”

“Poor and in love is a deep vein for singer-songwriter types, and the Oak Creek Band does it particularly well. The opening song on the outfit's debut EP, "1934," is touching and sincere, beautifully sung by Arizona natives Jenna Cunningham and Daniel Watters. The two moved to Denver in July 2009 and formed the band soon after, pulling their rhythm section from local jam outfit Frogs Gone Fishin'. This is a very polished first effort, probably a product of the fact that Watters and Cunningham have been making music together since high school. Here's hoping they keep at it.”

“Admittedly, the last few weeks have been a whirlwind of tiring excitement. Now, as the school-semester draws to a close, I have found myself holed up with nothing to do except study, write term-papers, and complain about the cold weather (and lack of actual snowfall). Needless to say, I’ve been a bit of a curmudgeon. However, a bit of brightness came across my ears in the form of The Oak Creek Band. After listening to nothing but gaze-experimental tunes for several months, The Oak Creek Band brought me back to one of my musical joys: folk-inspired singer-songwriter pop. “1934,” the first track off the group’s eponymous EP features a pleasant rolling melody that showcases the talent of singer Jenna Cunningham. “We Were Alive” shifts into a slightly more proggy-90′s-sounding style (with a guitar riff that may or may not have been lifted from Weezer’s “El Scorcho”) while “Diving Bell” returns to simple folksy beauty. ”

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