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Mike Stinson / Press

"Mike Stinson is dangerous, the kind of songwriter who can upend the way you see the world with a single line, and whose lean, mean rock and roll machine of a band usually starts at a Chuck Berry gallop and goes from there. They can crank it so hard, in fact, it's entirely possible to miss all the diamond-tipped rejoinders, double entendres, aphorisms and the occasional outright burn that litter Stinson's songs, and make him one of the wickedest lyricists around today."

Houston Press

"Mike Stinson is dangerous, the kind of songwriter who can upend the way you see the world with a single line, and whose lean, mean rock and roll machine of a band usually starts at a Chuck Berry gallop and goes from there. They can crank it so hard, in fact, it's entirely possible to miss all the diamond-tipped rejoinders, double entendres, aphorisms and the occasional outright burn that litter Stinson's songs, and make him one of the wickedest lyricists around today."

Houston Press

““…his new album is so sweeping and sky high that it should be the one to wake up the world about the musician's true talents. Because when it comes to songwriters, right now Stinson has few peers. He has taken country and rock and boiled them down to their essence before injecting everything with the kind of ju-ju that Gram Parsons died for, except Stinson is the stone cold real deal and would never need the Rolling Stones for street cred.””

Bentley’s Bandstand, The Morton Report

"...other gems show that his flare for songwriting is better than ever. Life’s troubles are laid out with fiery humor in “Late for My Funeral,” the anguish of love is woven through “This Year,” and a there’s a poignant dose of introspection as he tries to find his way out of the “Lost Side of Town.”Houston's clearly lit a new fire in Stinson's music, and R.S. Field turns out to be the right man to get it on tape."

No Depression / Hyperbolium

"He can kick out the honky-tonk jams with the best of them, and he can tear out your heart with a ballad."

Houston Chronicle

"...in the honky-tonk world of southern California (and now, Texas), Mike Stinson is king. His latest album, Hell and Half of Georgia, covers your classic country bases – loyalty (“Died and Gone to Houston”), money struggles (“Box I Take To Work”), heartbreak (“This Year”), general life problems (“Late for My Funeral”) – and with the help of R.S. Fields, ups the roadhouse rock ante while prescribing a liberal dose of the “Texas treatment.”

Los Angeles Magazine

“His high-octane country-rock track comes off the brand new album, Hell and Half of Georgia, which finds the honky-tonk revivalist releasing his first set of tunes written exclusively in the Lone Star State. Stinson then recruited veteran producer R.S. Fields (John Prine, Billy Joe Shaver, Justin Townes Earle) to make sure his roots were properly planted.”

“Texas Music Magazine’s 2012 Artists of The Year – Mike Stinson No. 53 (Winter 2013) Mike Stinson took a leap of faith three years ago, chucking his crown as the reigning king of Los Angeles honky tonkers aside, loading a U-Haul and heading for Texas. Since arriving in Houston in June 2009, it hasn’t been easy; he’s had to claw and scratch and hustle to learn the ways and mores of the Texas scene. But 2012 finally saw Stinson turn a certain corner as he began to attract the attention of more venues, particularly in Austin. In the past year, though still based in Houston, he and his band have earned their spurs by becoming one of the only Houston roots acts who can regularly draw a decent payday in the Live Music Capitol. They’ve become favorites of the savvy dance crowd at Ginny’s Little Longhorn Saloon, the longtime stronghold of artists like Dale Watson, Billy Dee and Rick Broussard. He also finally came to the attention of the Continental Club as well as newer venues lik”

TEXAS MUSIC MAGAZINE
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