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Mikah Sykes / Press

“MIKAH SYKES, OZ STREET FOSSILS, TYPHOON (Rotture, 315 SE 3rd) Folk dude Mikah Sykes fits somewhere between Iron and Wine and early Bright Eyes. There's also some tremulous Sufjan Stevens instrumentation, guitar that feels a bit like Joanna Newsom's harp, and some kiddie-ish Daniel Johnston vocals. Not to get all reference crazy up in your grill, but sometimes when the shoe fits you've got to go jogging and get some exercise. (I don't understand what I'm talking about either.) Oz St. Fossils is straight up New Weird America old-timey. Straight-UP. This show will folk you up good and you'll love it. GM”

“I don’t think the universe rewards a good deed, and I’m not even sure that love is always the answer. That said, the way Mikah Sykes’ childlike voice meets his folk-blues finger-picking and promenades around a track is pretty damn adorable, hippie-ish or not. Sykes’ tendency toward spacey experimentation is tethered by his deep love of the blues, which brings a familiarity and structure to his work that makes it feel like home. For a guy who recorded his last album in John Frusciante’s living room, he has stayed one of Portland’s better-kept secrets...But I doubt that’ll last long. ”

Willamette Week

“Mikah Sykes' unique country, Mississippi delta, and Brazilian classical guitar fingerpicking style is a rarity that is not to be missed. This local guy has got talent beyond belief. So much so that John Frusciante of Red Hot Chili Peppers fame asked Sykes to record in his Los Angeles home studio (Frusciante backs up Sykes’ guitar on keyboards and guitar) after seeing him play a set in Eugene. ”

Willamette Week

“PRESS: Sykes, meanwhile, has been bouncing around avant-folk circles. After some time in respite, Sykes returns with a new album, Love Consequences and Serenity, recorded across the Northwest, from K Records' Dub Narcotic Studio in Olympia to sessions in Portland with the Decemberists' John Moen and others. A step away from his more challenging, free-jazz muses, Sykes' latest is sunny and open armed. It's one I've been waiting for from him for some time. ”