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Hotline / Press

“He's An Incredible Artist yall He's a rapper , he's a singer, he's a producer ,he's an engineer and he does his thing all over the world spreading that real real hip- hop !”

Kurtis Blow ( Hip Hop Legend) - HipHop Drop ( Video)

“Realest Rhyme in the World for the month of March !!!!!”

Esquire Magazine

“ The big labels and distributors don't seem to get it yet.Hotline says he's excited by how well his privately produced CD is moving--"We had no idea this would catch on so fast"--but he's the one who's selling it: cranking up the volume at parties, hawking copies on the streets of Fayetteville, persuading local radio stations to give it air time. ”

“Bahrain-based artist and rapper Richmond Shaw won the title for the number one rapper in the Middle East. He was felicitated by the NPR radio in the US. Popularly known as Hotline, Shaw shared some of his experiences of how he started off his career and about working with rapper 50 Cent's Gunit. Shaw has been in the industry for the last twenty years. “I have been not just a rapper but an M.C and an entertainer for about 20 years or so. It started when I was about 4 years old, watching my older brother Reme aka Cream recite rhymes for my uncle and other family members. When he finished I had jumped in with my own little rhythm. What started as an accident ended up being my career,” the rapper said. “It was nice to have worked with Kelly Rowland a few years ago and with Yung Joc “The music scene is blossoming in the Middle East. When I first came here it was pretty much non-existent. Now to be known as the pioneer and heartbeat of the Bahraini music scene brings great joy to m”

“Challenging the norms of a music genre commonly considered very negative in the Gulf region, Richmond describes his latest track as an ‘inspirational song’. I not only want to show the different ways that you can do hip-hop but also reach out to an older audience and show them that a new generation of music isn’t just confined to one type of sound.Gaining recognition for his alternative approach to music, he has released literally hundreds of tracks, collaborated with some of the region’s most promising rising artists and performed at many of the island’s biggest hip-hop concerts. He is a creature of the modern hip-hop era and has brushed shoulders with many of the industry’s most well known artists namely Cassidy, Bone crusher and Kelly Rowland.”

C. Goward - TimeOut Magazine

“The lives of the 2/3 Field Artillery, a.k.a “The Gunners” whose barracks are the bombed-out pleasure palace of Uday Hussein (nicknamed Gunner Palace), situated in the heart of the most volatile section of Baghdad. Captured are the day-to-day lives of these soldiers on the ground--whether swimming in Uday’s pool and playing golf on his putting green or executing raids on suspected terrorists,... See Full Description Genres: Documentary and War Running Time: 1 hr. 25 min. Release Date: March 4th, 2005 (NY/LA/SF/DC) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for strong language throughout, violent situations and some drug references. Distributors: Palm Pictures U.S. Box Office: $607,502”

“Sitting across from Richmond Shaw (aka Hotline) at his flat in Juffair with the sound of muffled hip-hop beats emanating from his bedroom, his beaming grin suggests he is on the cusp of something special. Dressed in baggy jeans and baseball cap, he looks like any other rapper. But his lyrics, in a mixture of Arabic and English, are far from the staple rap language of drugs, violence, sex and swear words. For his latest single, he’s traded popular hip-hop themes to focus instead on a country that has had a significant impact on his life and more importantly, his music. Bahrain has held a special place in Richmond’s heart ever since he arrived here in 2006. Now a well known face on the regional music scene, the 27-year-old is determined to put middle music industry on the map and bridge the Middle Eastern and Western cultures together using the universal language of music. ......(see more) ”

“‘I had to endure daily shellings and watch many of my unit members die before my eyes but my music kept me going. I thank god that I didn’t leave that stage in my life filled with anger and hatred. My experiences not only moulded my lyrics but they have also shaped my perceptions of the region and allowed me to be more understanding.’ From being in a situation six years ago where he was obligated to kill, Richmond now finds himself immersed in a culture that affords him a fresh perspective on life. ‘I have come to realise that things change no matter what. In my opinion, it’s better to be part of it. And it’s even better when you’re trying to become the change you want to see.’ ”

TimeOut Magazine

“Hotline is an accomplished musician from Michigan and companied the 5th Dubai Film Festival held at the Madinat Jumeira. But he is no ordinary singer producer participant at this event, you see Hotline, has been to the Middle East before as a US soldier of war with the first infantry division stationed in Iraq. Over the course of three years doing his tour of duty hotline realized that he had more in common with the Middle East than differences so in 2008 using the occasion of the DFF he made his second return but this time with a different objective and that is to bridge Middle East and Western culture together using the universal language of music.”

“Side B features sound bites from the documentary, including a two-part freestyle by Richmond "Hotline" Shaw. "We're really trying to use the music as a vehicle to start a dialogue about the war, and refocus the projects within the communities where a lot of these young men and women grew up, and probably listen to these mix shows.”

“This week an open-mike competition in Baghdad is expected to draw many of the front-line military's top performers. For American audiences, the best-known voices are probably the freestyle rappers in the documentary "Gunner Palace."There's going to be a whole culture that emerges from this war," says director Michael Tucker, who lived with his subjects for two months. Spc. Javorn Drummond, 22, one of the palace freestylers, has been rapping since he was a kid, but he says Iraq was a whole different thing. "In Iraq you can lose your life in half a second," he says. "But rapping keeps you focused. If you're sittin' on a gun and you're tired, waiting for a sniper to come at you, you just start thinking up a rap and your fear goes away. It's motivation, you get an adrenaline rush from it." He and his fellow rappers Richmond (Hotline) Shaw and Nicholas (Solo) Moncrief have rotated back to Fayetteville, N.C., where they're working on a compilation CD. ”

“Hotline is an up and coming musician from Michigan attending the 5th Dubai Film Festival held at the Madinat Jumeira. But he is no ordinary singer producer participant at this event, you see Hotline, has been to the Middle East before as a US soldier of war with the first infantry division stationed in Iraq. But over the course of three years doing his tour of duty hotline realized that he had more in common with the Middle East than differences so in 2008 using the occasion of the DFF he made his second return but this time with a different objective and that is to bridge Middle East and Western culture together using the universal language of music.”

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