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Man Like Machine / Press

“The balls on the bass and synth passages suggest some form of allegiance to bands like Brainiac and The Locust, where electro-decay and tight low end give the overall sound a jerky, unstable quality: organized chaos is a good phrase. DiSonrisa’s drumming is controlled, restrained, and rather technical. The result of all of this is a certain thickness that lends itself simultaneously to the dance-friendly sound of The Faint and the machine-like tone of projects like Nine Inch Nails and Aphex Twin. Bass swells in songs like “Smoking Gun” (Kills for Thrills, 2010) mutate the otherwise pop-driven guitars and vocal patterns just enough to cement the band’s claims to originality. Yes, the songs are hopelessly catchy, but only as much as they are strange, weird… twisted even. What does all of this add up to? It’s called good songwriting.....”

“Alongside the devil-may-care apathetic mentality that permeated the ethos of '90s grunge bands, Philadelphia trio Man Like Machine introduces the glam elements of electroclash and goth. Loud, dramatic and angsty with lots of snyth, the band completes its homage to an era past (and present) with skinny black jeans and mussed-up hair. But it's not some shtick—the songs are catchy, compelling and unsettling. The darkness that seeped out of bands like the Cure and Duran Duran is eminently at home with Man Like Machine. And like both bands, Man Like Machine can twist anything into a good, solid pop tune. ”

“The eccentric sound of Prowler makes me want to run around my bedroom aimlessly while flailing my arms in the air in surrender. Their mutated Talking Heads funk with its sporadic beats and groove guitar riffs allows them to cross the bridge between performing with hip hop artists and indie rockers. They’ll be sharing The Khyber stage tonight with aggressive electro rockers Man Like Machine, an impressive trio that we think has a bright future. Check out their cover of U2’s “New Years Day” from an in studio performance at Radio 104.5. It’s so good that Bono might stop saving the world for a minute to spark his lighter for an encore, but their original material is equally impressive.”

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