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Kitty & the Harts (locked) / Press

“Quotes, quote quote.”

Quotes.

“Quote quote quote”

Q.U.O.T.E. Weekly

“Quotey mc quote quote yeah! Quotey mc quote quote yeah! Quotey mc quote quote yeah! Quotey mc quote quote yeah! Quotey mc quote quote yeah! Quotey mc quote quote yeah! Quotey mc quote quote yeah! Quotey mc quote quote yeah! Quotey mc quote quote yeah! Quotey mc quote quote yeah! Quotey mc quote quote yeah! Quotey mc quote quote yeah! Quotey mc quote quote yeah! Quotey mc quote quote yeah! Quotey mc quote quote yeah! Quotey mc quote quote yeah! Quotey mc quote quote yeah! Quotey mc quote quote yeah! Quotey mc quote quote yeah! Quotey mc quote quote yeah! Quotey mc quote quote yeah! Quotey mc quote quote yeah! Quotey mc quote quote yeah! Quotey mc quote quote yeah! Quotey mc quote quote yeah! Quotey mc quote quote yeah! Quotey mc quote quote yeah! Quotey mc quote quote yeah! Quotey mc quote quote yeah! Quotey mc quote quote yeah! Quotey mc quote quote yeah! Quotey mc quote quote yeah! Quotey mc quote quote yeah! Quotey mc quote quote yeah! Quotey mc quot”

quotes quoterly

“Feed me purr short hair sleep in the sink chuf, eat shed everywhere sleep on your face chase the red dot persian.”

Kittens Weekly

“Kittens develop very quickly from about two weeks of age until their seventh week. Their coordination and strength improve, they play-fight with their litter-mates, and begin to explore the world outside the nest or den. They learn to wash themselves and others as well as play hunting and stalking games, showing their inborn ability as predators. These innate skills are developed by the kittens' mother or other adult cats bringing live prey to the nest. Later, the adult cats also demonstrate hunting techniques for the kittens to emulate.”

Wikipedia

“The word "kitten" derives from Middle English kitoun (ketoun, kyton etc.), which itself came from Old French chitoun, cheton: "kitten".[1] The young of big cats are called cubs rather than kittens. Either term may be used for the young of smaller wild felids such as ocelots, caracals, and lynx, but "kitten" is usually more common for these species.”

Wikipedia

“I LOVE this bad! They are the cat's meow!”

Two Tails - The Cat Zine

“Sleep on your face chuf claw knock over the lamp climb the curtains lay down in your way, stretching sleep on your keyboard sleep on your keyboard scratched.”

Kittens Daily

“kittens!!!!”

“Zomg kittens!”

someone else

“kittenssssssssssssss”

someone

“Kittens kittens kittens!!!”

me
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