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KAPALA / Press

“Kapala's imaginative arrangements of "'Alika" and "Kawika" define new frontiers for Hawaiian-language music. Imprint may not be "Hawaiian enough" for the Grammy ballot, but it is a milestone in modern Hawaiian music.”

““Very hip! One of the most creative recordings to come out of Hawaii in years!"”

Conductor Matt Catingub - Honolulu Symphony Pops

“What a great all-around project. Love the details, arrangements are so stylish, voices are so sweet, so many different passages...could not ask for more textures of voice and musicality.”

Brother Noland - Legendary Singer/Songwriter/Educator

“Seven years and three albums later, the six-piece Kapala has played Hawaiian music that draws from many musical wells: jazz, world beat, traditional Hawaiian hula and bluesy reggae. “We were all at the point in our life when we wanted to do something that we wanted to do,” Artis says. “Where we had creative input. It helped that we were friends to begin with. The stars just aligned, really.””

"Kapala’s music is like dinner at Roy’s. It’s those same Hawaiian classics that you love, but with a contemporary twist brought on by the veteran chefs that throw it together. Kapala’s tunes retain that authentic Hawaiian flavor while opening it up to a wider crowd in a fun yet sophisticated way"

“The versatile band members — including Lopaka Ho‘opi‘i, Richard Heirakuji, Zanuck Kapala Lindsey, Lance Kalanikai Artis and Adj Larioza – have longstanding ties with one another that go back as far as middle school. The group decided on the name Kapala, meaning “imprint” or “stamp,” such as the ohe kapala – a stamp made from ohe (bamboo) used to imprint the designs on kapa (bark cloth). Their aggregate experience adds character and charisma to Kapala’s integration of traditional Hawaiian music with jazz, blues, contemporary, Latin, swing, rock and roll and other genres, as the band’s Bay Area performances last August showed. And now their original hope to make an “imprint” on the music scene is coming to fruition.”

“In many ways, these multiple CD release parties with musical guests perfectly reflect Kapala’s all-for-one philosophy. Formed in 2006 and composed of six members – Kimo Artis and his brother, Kai, along with industry vets Zanuck Lindsey, Lopaka Ho’opi’i, Richard Heirakuji and Adj Larioza, all of whom have spent much of their careers as backup musicians to everyone who’s anyone in local music – Kapala represents its members first real opportunity at performing their own brand of traditional and contemporary Hawaiian music with a blend of country, rock, jazz and soul influences.”

“Kapala's music is as innovative for its time as the Richard Kauhi Quartette was in 1948. An array of fresh and polished arrangements that traverse the parameters of all music, set within a traditional Hawaiian context. Congratulations to Kapala on a truly groundbreaking piece of work.”

Harry B. Soria - Territorial Airwaves

“Every facet, flavor, in this remarkable work is presented with outstanding musical and interpretive integrity. So despite our varying tastes in music, “IMPRINT” definitely has something for everyone to enjoy.”

Kimo Hussey - Pacific Music Foundation

“When the band Kapala stormed the stage it was nothing but pure energy as band members Lance Kalanikai Artis, Ashley Kimo Artis, Richard Lanakila Heirakuji, Lopaka Ho’opi’i, Adriano Kawika Larioza and Zanuck Kapala Lindsey, put on a high energy and very entertaining show, kicking off their set with “96795” and “Chigasaki.” The crowd really got into Kapala’s set as the band made their way through a number of their hits including “Come on Home” and “Palapalai.” Some fans headed to the back of Pano Hall to dance, while others danced at their seats.”

“The group decided on the name Kapala, meaning “imprint” or “stamp,” such as the ohe kapala – a stamp made from ohe (bamboo) used to imprint the designs on kapa (bark cloth). Their aggregate experience adds character and charisma to Kapala’s integration of traditional Hawaiian music with jazz, blues, contemporary, Latin, swing, rock and roll and other genres, as the band’s Bay Area performances last August showed. And now their original hope to make an “imprint” on the music scene is coming to fruition. “It’s about self-reflection for us. It was about us looking at what have we done, not just musically but for our families,” Artis said. “That reflection continues to push us to better ourselves and we feel that is the message our listeners are picking up. The reflection to inspire people to ask themselves, ‘Am I who I want to be?’ ””

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