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John Schmitt / Press

“John Schmitt celebrated his birthday (and noted that two members of his band/guests had birthdays one day on either side of the show) by playing at The Living Room. He had a full band and some special guests. We don’t need an excuse (like a mere birthday) to come see John Schmitt. If we can make it, we’ll be there. In fact, during the show, he announced that he’s playing Rockwood Music Hall Stage 2, this coming Thursday, at 7pm (also a full-band show). It’s his first time at Rockwood 2, and we’re already committed to being there (you should come too!). Let’s review why we go see John as often as we can: fantastic voice excellent guitar player terrific band (though he’s superb solo) wonderful songwriter as nice a human being as you could want to meet! All of the above were there in spades last night. An incredible set, thanks John.”

“Even though it’s only been a few weeks since we last saw John Schmitt perform (May 13th at The Living Room), we were really looking forward to this show last night. The set at The Living Room was excellent, which is reason enough to want more. But Rockwood Music Hall is also more intimate which in itself was a draw. John delivered a completely satisfying experience (to high expectations!). He had a few surprises for us as well (another great reason to go see your favorite artists often). You can read a number of my posts about John. Here are the key facts that you’ll learn: he has a wonderful voice he plays guitar wonderfully he writes exceptional songs (OK, I should have said wonderful songs, to stick with the theme) Winking smile he has many talented musical buddies (both genders), who are only too happy to make music with him All of those were in play last night, including John selecting an excellent set list.”

"With his uncompromisingly honest and simple approach, John Schmitt has the ability to find great beauty in the most insignificant of details. As a wordsmith, Schmitt can be both subtle and painfully graphic but always strikes a chord with his audience. Influenced by the likes of Tom Petty, and combined with a stirring vocal reminiscent of Damien Rice, he offers vivid, moving imagery of American life - both the good and the bad - which resonates with locals and strangers alike. A self-taught musician from a young age - and after years of experience performing with other bands - Schmitt is finally embarking on a solo career that promises great things."

Rebel Spirit Music Review

“John Schmitt may not be a household name yet, but just you wait. His latest release “Ophelia” was produced by Caleb Hawley who just made it through the first round of Hollywood week on a little show called American Idol. Interested yet? Good. This album can best be described as a little folk rock, and R&B with a whole lotta soul. The record starts with his song ‘Two Souls’ and it becomes immediately clear that this album is a personal journey. City life, love, and all the struggles and excitement that come with changes in scenery, relationships and work are expertly crafted within the melodies and lyrics. His music is fresh from start to end and his future is definitely looking bright.”

“..."Schmitt shifted through several genres throughout his performance and became hard to pin down to a single genre. At times, funk and soul seemed to be favored. Other times, Americana or folk seemed more appropriate. Simple and expected chord progressions led me to believe it to be folk. Then, jazz and chromatic scale exploration left me not so sure. All throughout, I noticed hints of John Mayer, Dave Matthews, and even Jason Mraz in his style and sound. This unique, chameleon approach to genre kept the set dynamic from one song to the next. Schmitt’s setlist contained a balanced mixture of original songs and interesting covers. He started with “Two Souls Meet in the City,” which immediately showcased his strong, smooth, and soulful voice. “Going Back” displayed his emotive lyrical style, describing divorce in a beautiful, yet painfully real way...'”