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Jen Kearney / Press

“Picture if you will an amalgam of War and the Grateful Dead with elements of funk jazz and you will likely come up with an approximation, howsoever poor, of the brassy voiced Jen Kearney as she skillfully steers this collection’s opening track “Waiting For It.” Subsequent numbers explore Earth, Wind and Fire style R&B (“Too Far”); soul-stirring electric piano funk (“Overwhelming”); melodic jazzy piano balladry (“Corner of My Eye”); a Latin-flavored dance number (“Better”); and Funkadelic style heaviness also reminiscent of Stevie Wonder (“What If”). She also offers up a calm, gospel-styled piece (“Age of Blame,” and, to top it all off, an ambitiously slow and decidedly trippy slow burner of a number called “Sanctuary in Sabotage.” Those who revere 1970s-era jazz, R&B and funk stylings will find a great deal to like in these original compositions.”

“Combining rock, jazz, funk, soul and hot Latin beats, Jen Kearney is back with a new 8-track album guaranteed to burn a whole in your headphones. Age of Blame is Kearney’s first studio album since 2009’s Year of The Ox and it was well worth the wait. Kearney’s ginormous pipes, smart lyrics and talented band brew up some serious mojo, making this a groovy collection that clearly has the dirt of working musicians under its fingernails.”

“There is a more easeful flow coming from her instrumentation and she sings with greater eloquence. Kearney shows more tasteful self-restraint than ever, and she offers more fine touches throughout this album than her previous recordings. Kearney has much to be proud of here. Age Of Blame is a standout for its masterful vocal work, sophisticated musicianship, and in its elevation over the Year Of The Ox album, which is no minor accomplishment.”

“The Lowell singer digs into sweet funk while winking at influences both obvious (Sly Stone, Stevie Wonder) and obscure (Donny Hathaway, Roberta Flack). Most of the credit goes to Kearney — her booming soul voice and smart, tight songs provide the pillars of the eight tunes. But her band adds some awesome voodoo.”

"Kearney and the Lost Onion provide a dense musical potpourri that is ever surprising...Aside from the intricate arrangements, which the whole band helps flesh out, the other startling thing about the new album is how potent and confident Kearney’s vocals are, even as she glides through that panoply of styles..."

"A few weeks ago, I found gold during a marathon listening session...something close to the wondrous flavor of prime ’70s Stevie...Kearney qualifies as a well-kept local secret. That’s what happens to talented people who pursue a course unrelated to popular trends."

“Enraptured by Kearney's soulful vocals, percussionist Yahuba Garcia's relentless conga rhythms, and a trio of funky horns, the smiling faces and shaking hips in the crowd that night confirmed what some Lowell residents have known for years- Jen Kearney & The Lost Onion know how to command an audience. For Kearney herself, playing that night with East L.A.'s Grammy winning veterans was a high point..."”

Brett Cromwell - Merrimack Valley Magazine

“When Jen Kearney and her band the Lost Onion are rumbling along at full throttle, they conjure up a deliciously infectious sound unlike almost anything other local pop/rock artists are doing. It’s muscular and sinuous and bluesy and rollicking and Latin-drenched and…well, think Susan Tedeschi backed by Stevie Wonder’s band Wonderlove, and you’ll have a vague point of reference..." ”

Dean Johnson - Longtime Boston Music Critic, WBZ, WCAP

"And with a voice that rivals Stevie Wonder and Eddie Levert in power and soul, Jen Kearney delivers the goods with a passion and conviction that leaves no question she's one of the best female vocalists singing right now..."

"From a musical standpoint, what you get is a sonic ride from the opening funk groove of “Born” to the soulful “Succotash Blue” to the folk influenced “Gentle and Precise” to the jazz-fusion groove of “Lunar Interlude.” Kearney’s powerful but nuanced vocal work captures your attention and holds your interest as she tells her story. Her exceptional band navigates varied styles with ease.."

"Kearney’s voice has been compared to Stevie Wonder and on this album it sometimes sounds like him; sometimes like a young, screechy Michael Jackson; sometimes like a booming Joan Armatrading; and sometimes it’s uniquely her...The main theme that runs through this album is the desire for self-improvement and the pull of nature (specifically the moon) vs our free will. Kearney uses these primitive concepts in... one cohesive album that should be savored like a fine meal, not scarfed down like a drive-through cheeseburger at 2 a.m. after a Saturday night out."

"Jen Kearney's improvement has been steady and exquisite. Her versatility is outstanding, whether it's on rock-edged material that she pulls from the heart, or R&B-infused songs that she pulls from the soul.''

Steve Morse - a longtime Boston Globe correspondent who has also contributed to Billboard and

"Jen Kearney's improvement has been steady and exquisite. Her versatility is outstanding, whether it's on rock-edged material that she pulls from the heart, or R&B-infused songs that she pulls from the soul.''

Steve Morse - a longtime Boston Globe correspondent who has also contributed to Billboard and
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