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Great American Taxi / Press

“Three records and a few personnel changes after the band’s debut in 2006, the aptly named Great American Taxi remains a vehicle that allows some of the best roots musicians in America to cruise in musical style. Led by Leftover Salmon front man, Vince Herman and keyboardist Chad Staehly, the group continues to consistently churn out music on Paradise Lost that recalls the glory days of twangy folk rock a la Gram Parsons and Little Feat, with a solid bluegrass and boogie-woogie backbone. From the Dylan-inflected harmonica and mellow alt-ish country of “A.M. Radio” to the roadhouse swagger of “Angel Dust” and the offbeat “Swamp Song” – which recounts the demise of a craggy old backwoods wrangler – the Taxi boys are assisted by the amply talented likes of guest musicians Tim O’Brien, Todd Snider (who also produces here), Barry Sless and Elizabeth Cook. The varied moods, tones and grooves on Paradise Lost add up to one big Americana win. Paradise Lost is out now on GA”

“GREAT AMERICAN TAXI, “Paradise Lost” (self-released) ✰✰✰✰1⁄2 — Rootsy rockers Great American Taxi have gotten better with every passing album and latest effort “Paradise Lost” finds them at the top of their Americana game. This is one of the rare records that can inform and/or entertain, depending on your frame of mind. There are messages about mountaintop removal, nuclear energy, soldiers returning home from war and the economic recession included in the 12 songs, but GAT don’t beat you over the head with their politics. The wonderful Todd Snider-produced “Paradise Lost” and lends his talents to keepers “Olden Days” (with Elizabeth Cook and Barry Sless) and “Radiation Blues.” Tim O’Brien also guests on “Silver Fiddle” and “Blair Mountain,” while Great American Taxi handle things by themselves on standouts “Poor House,” “Penny Arcade,” “Gonna Make a Record” and closer “Easy Listening.” Great stuff. (Jeffrey Sisk)”

The Daily News

"On a record that ironically bemoans money loss (“Poor House”) to natural wonders (“Blair Mountain”) to brain cells (“Angel Dust”) to immune systems (“Radiation Blues”) to a profitable career (“Gonna Make a Record”—and name-checking MTV, Rolling Stone and Relix )—the 6-year-old Americana act finds their muse. Once appearing as a curious all-star side project of jam and bluegrass brethren, Great American Taxi have hit their stride with a remarkable record that defines their purpose, rocks with passion and leaves a memorable artistic impression. Songs surface, punch the listener with boisterous vigor and then move forward to the next creative idea, while featuring guest collaborators Elizabeth Cook, Barry Sless and Tim O’Brien. What is most telling is how confident the quintet—led by Vince Herman and Chad Staehly, and produced by Todd Snider —appear to be."

"First time I saw The Taxi, I asked if I could join...can't like a band much better than that...not only do I love their songwriting and musicianship, but they also wake up every morning and ask themselves what they can do to be better hippies...then they go back to bed."

Todd Snider

"A giddy combination of boogie, blues, bluegrass, nu-grass and honky-tonk, it's as readily infectious and genuinely freewheeling as its eclectic content might imply."

Vintage Guitar Magazine

"Carbone (Railroad Earth) brought in the four-piece Peak to Freak Horns, pedal steel wiz Barry Sless, banjo player Matt Flinner and the Black Swan Singers to give GAT’s songs more depth; the resulting 14 songs boast a much fuller sound than the band’s debut studio album. The New Orleans-infused track “(Just When You Think It Can’t) Get No Better (Then It Does)” stands out thanks to Vince Herman’s Dr. John-like vocal delivery and the flair of the Peak to Freak Horns. Other highlights are GAT’s cover of Jeff Tweedy’s Uncle Tupelo-era track “New Madrid” and Sless’ pedal steel work."

Relix

"Great American Taxi's sophomore release finds the band in strong form."

Denver Post

"Let's get one thing straight right off the bat -- Great American Taxi is not a jam band. It's not too hard to understand how their particular brand of open-hearted Americana has found an audience in that milieu, and maybe they stretch out while swapping solos on-stage, but there's no loosey-goosey jamming whatsoever on Reckless Habits...GAT is pretty much a straight-up, old-school country-rock outfit. Not only do they wear their Grateful Dead, Flying Burrito Brothers, and Commander Cody influences on their sleeves, they overtly reference their forebears in the lyrics of their songs. The title track chronicles the story of Gram Parsons, telling of his time with the Burritos, the International Submarine Band, Byrds, etc."

All Music

"A giddy combination of boogie, blues, bluegrass, nu-grass and honky-tonk, it's as readily infectious and genuinely freewheeling as its eclectic content might imply."

Blurt

"Their uninhibited sound a swinging concoction of swampy blues, progressive bluegrass funky New Orleans strut, Southern boogie, honky tonk, gospel and good old fashioned rock ’n’ roll. That loose, anything-can-happen feel is the hallmark of Reckless Habits, the band’s second album, which was recorded in Loveland, Colo., with producer Tim Carbone (from Railroad Earth) working together to bring the feel of an onstage performance to the recording process."

Twangville.com

"Their uninhibited sound a swinging concoction of swampy blues, progressive bluegrass funky New Orleans strut, Southern boogie, honky tonk, gospel and good old fashioned rock ’n’ roll. That loose, anything-can-happen feel is the hallmark of Reckless Habits, the band’s second album, which was recorded in Loveland, Colo., with producer Tim Carbone (from Railroad Earth) working together to bring the feel of an onstage performance to the recording process."

San Antonio Express

"Their uninhibited sound a swinging concoction of swampy blues, progressive bluegrass funky New Orleans strut, Southern boogie, honky tonk, gospel and good old fashioned rock ’n’ roll. That loose, anything-can-happen feel is the hallmark of Reckless Habits, the band’s second album, which was recorded in Loveland, Colo., with producer Tim Carbone (from Railroad Earth) working together to bring the feel of an onstage performance to the recording process."

Glide

"They're like the second coming of Little Feat."

Radiofreeamericana.com

““The five-piece band out of Nederland plays a sound they have branded “Americana without borders.” It’s a little more groovy, a little more rootsy and vintage country than what Herman played at the big ole festival…"”

Telluride Daily Planet