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Glass Homes / Press

“The beginning of the second night of Gathering of the Clouds 2 started off with a bang with the raw, nervy energy that seems to be plugged directly into Glass Homes. Without much of a hitch, Nick Salmon and Brian Blaney switched around instrumentation with the latter playing bass with processed sounds and the former both setting off programmed sequences and playing live electronics when not fronting the band and playing guitar. During the breakdown section of "End It" the collision of sounds sounded like Salmon and Blaney were ready to take the title literally. Musically it was reminiscent of The Cure gone aggressively cathartic or Cursive stripped down to the barest nerve.”

“This night started off with a band not many people know about yet called Glass Homes, a duo comprising a guitarist and singer and a bass player, with programmed drums and synths. These guys had some aggressive energy and sounded a bit like those "dance punk" bands from around a decade ago, but more like the Faint than Interpol. Great energy and tighter than a lot of bands.”

“Oh, sure, from the jump this album screams "21st century post-punk!" And, yes, it was recorded by the Faint's Kyle Petersen. But there is something more desperate, spooky and urgent in these songs. "Stars" breaks out of any expected mold with a dissonance that seems to warp out of the groove before coming back in with a markedly different flavor; "Night No Day," meanwhile, dispenses with any expected formula whatsoever with its moody phrasings. These songs don't serve as background music to hedonistic pursuits; more often, they resemble the scarier moments of the Dismemberment Plan's catalogue, with lyrics that tackle politics and personal crisis with unsentimental clarity. Indeed, the trappings of "dance punk" are here, but don't be fooled: This record is beautifully vicious.”

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