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Frankie's Blues Mission / Press

“Frankie Lee Robinson has performed the blues for decades in a variety of acts. Robinson has teamed with the same two musicians, bassist Kermit J. Maxwell and drummer Al Largo, for more than six years in Frankie's Blues Mission. Robinson said this is the longest he's ever gone with a single lineup, and he's happy the band will boast more than half a century of blues chops at the Nothin' But the Blues Fest in Clemson this weekend. Frankie's Blues Mission will perform Saturday at 1 p.m. with Chick Willis and Clemson's own Hoodoo Hounds at Patrick Square in Clemson, but the Blues Mission also will play a gig at the Esso Club later that night. Half of a Frankie's Blues Mission show is the band's original take on old material and a presentation of its own music. Even though Robinson describes the band's style as closest to Chicago blues, he feels the band presents a wide swath of the blues. ”

“Blues aficionados from the Carolinas, Georgia and all over the southeastern U.S. will soon be making their way toward Charleston, S.C. for the twenty-first annual Lowcountry Blues Bash, which begins Feb. 3 and rocks on through Feb. 19. North Carolina’s King Bees deliver swingin’ blues at every turn. Can’t go wrong here. Frankie’s Blues Mission from Atlanta dishes up some hot West Side Chicago-style electric blues. Yeah! Another Atlantan, Lefty Williams is on the roster, too. If you’ve never heard this one-armed guitarist, get you to Penny Zamagni of the King Bees brings take-your-breath-away vocals and solid songwriting to each performance. It’s worth the price of gasoline ”

“Georgia based Frankie’s Blues Mission will open the Magic City Blues Society’s 2012 Phelan Park Music Series. As the name implies, these gentlemen are on a mission. The bands influences are varied, from Muddy Waters and T-Bone Walker to Willie Dixon, Charlie Mingus to Art Tatum and Count Basie. Combined together their sound could be described as Chicago West Side Blues. Definitely city blues, not country blues. Their purpose, to present the blues, jazz, R&B and zydeco in the best of the African-American tradition with all the energy they can muster. Last year saw the release of their self-produced CD, Sleepin’ Dog. The CD garnered many great reviews. To quote Living Blues magazine: Unlike the typical “no label/no number” vanity disc, Sleepin’ Dog boasts a fresh sound firmly rooted in, but not bound by, local tradition. It’s not just the same old blues, and deserves to be picked up for wider release.”

“Frankie’s Blues Mission is an Atlanta-based trio that plays it pretty close to traditional blues (especially Chicago West Side blues) and R&B, adding their own touches of soul and jazz to their sound. Their debut release, Sleepin’ Dog, bears strong witness to their artistry. Sleepin’ Dog consists of 11 tracks, seven originals by the band. The opener, “I’m So Lonely Since You’ve Gone,” despite its mournful theme, pops along against a funky backdrop. The title cut is a tough West Side shuffle, featuring harmonica from Vince Alexander, and “I Need Me Some You” has a great guitar intro from Robinson. There are also three instrumentals – “Blues for C.K.” showcases Robinson playing some particularly grungy guitar, “Soul Shuffle” is a tight soul groover, and “McDaniel Street” leans toward the jazz side of blues. There are also five solid covers, notably Roy Lee Johnson’s “When A Guitar Plays The Blues.” ”

“Georgia based Frankie’s Blues Mission will open the Magic City Blues Society’s 2012 Phelan Park Music Series. As the name implies, these gentlemen are on a mission. The bands influences are varied, from Muddy Waters and T-Bone Walker to Willie Dixon, Charlie Mingus to Art Tatum and Count Basie. Combined together their sound could be described as Chicago West Side Blues. Definitely city blues, not country blues. Their purpose, to present the blues, jazz, R&B and zydeco in the best of the African-American tradition with all the energy they can muster. Last year saw the release of their self-produced CD, Sleepin’ Dog. The CD garnered many great reviews. To quote Living Blues magazine: Unlike the typical “no label/no number” vanity disc, Sleepin’ Dog boasts a fresh sound firmly rooted in, but not bound by, local tradition. It’s not just the same old blues, and deserves to be picked up for wider release.”