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Emily Mure / Press

"There was/is something about her songs and voice that made me want to go off into a quiet place and to be sure I captured each and every note."

"(Odyssey is) an album of unpretentious, straight-and-true songwriting that draws from contemporary folk, acoustic country and intimate chamber pop...that reminds us of Nick Drake's sublime simplicity, string-backed arrangements and ethereal atmospherics." -Direct Current Music

"introspective, unorthodox, and powerful." -Adobe and Teardrops

"a smoky-voiced successor to Emmylou Harris and John Wesley Harding-era Dylan"

"One part jazzy vocal, one part classical arrangement, one part folk songwriter equate to ALL parts really fantastic music."

““(Odyssey is) a close-up and sometimes haunting folk album from New York City's Emily Mure. Confessional songwriting with delicate production. Emily's training as a classical oboist allows her to compose chamber folk arrangements that illuminate these songs and create a lush environment for her breathy vocals.” -the modern folk music of america”

““Odyssey is ambitious and honest and, honestly, just overwhelmingly enjoyable.””

“She writes brilliantly thought provoking folk music accompanied with a voice so rich and poignant that it hurts the heart.”

whatsup!nyc

“It’s hard to call Emily Mure anything but honest. The NYC-bred musician, who built up her solo chops busking in Ireland, creates pure and soulful music. Close your eyes listening to any of her songs and you’ll swear Norah Jones has a folk-singing sister. Looking to cry tears of tenderness? Turn up the volume on “Chocolate Milk," a song written for her grandmother, whose last words were, “I want chocolate milk and I want it now.” Mure usually plays solo, letting her smoky voice fill the room, but tonight she’ll be playing with the fullest band she’s ever assembled.”

"Clearly a good singer with a uniquely admirable consistency in her lyrical abilities, Emily’s songs and performance last week seemed to shun a stifling “hipsteresqe” genre or style, so too often the norm, and exuded a refreshingly traditional focus on songcraft. Emily’s influences are the most lyrically-driven geniuses of our time, and she’s learned very well to tell her stories, or paint her verbal pictures without forcing the words to the melody for the passive listener. Thank you for that." -Jezebel Music 1/9/08

Jezebel Music