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Elusive Parallelograms / Press

“The K-Nation/Cascio stage was as packed as we’d seen it for the Parallelograms’ set, which started out a bit shaky and poorly mixed, but the band and sound tent got things dialed in pretty quickly. It occurred to us at this point that the EPs are the closest thing Milwaukee has to a Meat Puppets: although there’s none of the country influence, there’s a similar proggy, psychedelic, circuitously catchy pop aesthetic, with hooks that almost seem accidental and the ability to really crank the intensity when called for. It’s also worth noting that frontman Andrew Foys is no slouch of a singer. In the world of underground rock, we’ve gotten used to overlooking the inability to hold a proper note, but Foys’ range and pitch were always spot-on, and his loud-and-clear vocals reminded us of how lacking this element is in so much psychedelic and indie rock these days. The band won over some new fans for sure, and not just because they gave away a bunch of t-shirts.”

“Fuzzy, grungy and unabashedly in love with post-punk, Elusive Parallelograms proves on Fragments that they have ample amounts of genius within them. Whether or not that genius gets fleshed out on the next effort remains to be seen. Now six recordings into their career, the band seems firmly bent to release music on their own terms for themselves. Whether that translates to success is anyone's guess. But for now, Fragments is something worth celebrating and something worth keeping an eye on. It is certainly far from perfect, but it also eerily pure. Anytime rock music can be this unfiltered, this naked and this brainy, it's worth a few minutes of editorial. Either way, it will get people thinking. Isn't that really the point of art after all?”

“With their new Fragments EP out tomorrow, you can now hear the premiere of single “Semantics” from Milwaukee, WI band Elusive Parallelograms. Fragments represents their fifth release and finds the band growing and more confident than ever. “Semantics” is a music handful as Elusive Parallelograms drop shoegaze, prog-rock and power pop in a blender to yield a just under two minute track that builds a wall of sound with impressive muscle. The middle of the short track is really where the song stands out as all of the instruments and distortion drop off which leaves nothing but the solid vocals from singer Andrew Foys to bridge the power for great results. You can check out Elusive Parallelograms single “Semantics” below!”

“HABITS " Comprising six songs and clocking in at just under 15 minutes, the record is bound to leave listeners wanting more, particularly with the shimmering instrumental first track, “Reverse Polarity.” It’s really only about a third of a song, yet it feels as epic as 96 seconds possibly could. That tune and “Glue” borrow a mesmerizing, watery guitar effect from The Bends-era Radiohead, but the comparison ends there. Parallelograms rarely stick with any one melody or motif for very long—instead of another verse or chorus, they’re more likely to crank some electronic effects for a few seconds or just end the song.... these are certainly some of Elusive Parallelograms’ best songs yet.”

“FRAGMENTS " Inventive and impeccably crafted—and easily recognizable as Elusive Parallelograms—this may be the best batch of tunes the band has released yet !"”

“Rocksposure reviews" Habits" "Think of all the boring indie rock shows you’ve sat through where you can’t tell when one drone ends and the next one begins. Cohesion can be boring. These guys ain’t that."”

"bands are releasing more music than ever, faster than ever,that's just fine with Milwaukee's Elusive Parallelograms “We're constantly writing and recording,” says singer/guitarist Andrew Foys.“We could probably write a record in a weekend, if we had to.”"The guitar-centric psychedelic-pop quintet is releasing its new EP, Habits, this month, and has plans for at least two more releases this year. That accelerated pace marks a change of course for the band, which had taken its time crafting its first albums, 2009's And Everything Changes,last year's Modern Splendor. Habits was recorded and mixed in a comparatively swift week and a half.Habits certainly doesn't feel rushed. The songs are as tight and catchy as any the group has done, the production is big and vibrant. An engineer by trade, Foys built his own studio so the band records and produces its own material.Their production is decidedly hi-fi:a lush,multilayered surge of sound on the scale of Butch Vig's big alt-rock recor

“Hometown: Milwaukee, WI Recommended if you like… Chester French, the Von Bondies Why we picked them: Who says psychedelia-influenced, shoegazer guitar riffs need to last five minutes a pop? These fellas have a knack for condensing the fuzz.”

“And Everything Changes 4stars Manhattan label Rainbow Quartz continues to see out artsy, edgy guitar pop, coming up trumps with Milwaukee's Elusive Parallelograms."Destroyer" or more melodic, "Benzedrine"...”

“Fuck the beer. This is Milwaukee’s best.”

“Milwaukee’s own modern psychedelic rock quintet Elusive Paralellograms has put out an uber-accessible wall of sound with influences like Queens of the Stone Age, The Mars Volta, the entire year of 1969 (folk music included) and geometry. With three (count ‘em, three!) guitars!...”

“The Elusive Parallelograms Go Back to the Future Listening to "Rev," the first song on the Elusive Parallelograms' new album and everything changes, one's immediate reaction is to get up and dance around the room. It's an incredibly fun song...”

“Polaroids (see, above) have never really gone away and neither has rock ‘n roll. Milwaukee’s Elusive Parallelograms are akin to the art of the Polaroid, all washes and waves of guitars and synths with plenty of fuzz to make a messy and relatable feel. With their roots buried deep in some serious rock roots, they’ve garnered lots of praise for last year’s release, Modern Splendor. This Friday sees the band releasing a brand new EP at Milwaukee’s Cactus Club, called Habits and where Modern Splendor had a bit of give and even seemed sentimentally psychedelic in terms of an homage to 90′s’ Dandy Warhols and the like, Habits is a bit of a crusher, knocking down sonic walls and making better use out of big hooks and still playing on those previous 90′s themes, but craftily making that anthemic sound a bit more modern.”