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Edward Hartline / Press

"Yet, perhaps one of the evening’s most outstanding performances belonged not to an industry veteran but to an 18 year-old rookie: Alabama-native Edward Hartline. Imagine a cross between the old school stylings of James Taylor, the raspy folk of Ray LaMontagne and, at times, the modern tones of singers like Alex Clare, and then throw in some teenage angst and skinny jeans: voilà, you’ve got yourself an Edward Hartline. The kid is young, a bit scrawny even, but he’s got the stage presence—and the chops—of a man who’s been doing this for decades. And it was clear by the amount of unhinged jaws around the room that, with a few more years under his belt, Hartline is going places. Definitely be on the lookout for this guy in the near future, folks."

"Self-taught musician and Alabama native, Edward Hartline... captured our imagination with his silvery voice and his ability to create vivid stories that reside within every word and every melody." "He has been immersed in music since he was little, and at the fearless age of eighteen, he has written and played some of the best songs we've ever heard."

"[The EP Lost] is rather striking for two main reasons: first is the young voice and a rather polished, mature, rich sound, and second is the incredible vocal range of the singer himself... the compositions... are rather delicate and intricate affairs that compliment his voice and vocal range well. ... the very atmospheric and slightly more uptempo "I'm Fine", which in all fairness I could consider a rather decent pop record with soul...stands out from the Lost EP. ...his music... could fit in quite easily with any middle of the road radio station playlist, however there is this modern contemporary young fresh twist in the classic mix which makes this rather a compelling record to listen to... as time goes on, I could imagine him fitting in easily with the likes of Michael Buble, James Morrison and James Blunt."

“Although good folk writing usually stems from troubled personal experiences and the subsequent wisdom of those experiences, you have to wonder where Edward has found his inspiration at the age of 16(sic)... his writing shows a maturity that contradicts his tender age and this combined with his husky voice makes you feel like you are listening to a man three times Edward’s age. The young Alabaman has managed to perfect his craft at an early age...writing since the age of eleven... he has managed to write some truly beautiful songs and will surely only get better... The throaty tone and soulfulness of his voice on ‘Gambling Man’ brings to mind... UK singer-songwriter James Morrison. Songs such as ‘Table For Two’ and ‘You’re To Blame’ offer a James Taylor like sincerity while ‘Sinner’s Blues’ shows a darker side, yet Edward proves equally adept at both. If he has managed to get this far at the age of 16 there is no telling how far he can go in the next few years.”

““With over 3200 submissions to our indie-acoustic issue, there were bound to be a couple of notable artists who didn’t make it into the top 25… We ended up with fifty additional indie-acoustic artists who deserve an honorable mention in this week’s indie-acoustic issue.””

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