x

You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience.

Drive-Thru Mystics / Press

“Duncan-born Aaron Hutto and his band of Drive-Thru Mystics reached a radio milestone this week. The group’s CD, “A Thousand Years of Oblivion,” is ranked No. 1 on KDVS Top 30 Records of the Week. KDVS is a student-run, community, independent, freeform radio station based in Davis, Calif. KDVS broadcasts on the web and at 9200 Watts on 90.3 FM in the Sacramento Valley from UC Davis. “This is the first time I have been No. 1 at something,” Hutto said. “Wow, this is huge for me.””

“With bassist, David Adams and drummer Nick Carvajal, Hutto feels good about things. A listen to the collection of recorded work, “A Thousand Years of Oblivion” has me asking where it’s been all of my life. Elements of early Flaming Lips joined with The Knack, and even some ‘60s-era Troggs prevail among the sea of originality wrapped in influence. I can envision almost every track showing up at one time or another on Little Steven’s Underground Garage radio show. Hutto’s spirit is an example of why so many heed the call of the music they love so much. Because love is something you don’t outgrow. You grow into it.”

“Drive-Thru Mystics crank out tunes reminscent of 60's garage rock with spurts of psychedelia-all of which sent the crowd of 50 plus fans dancing with partners or at times solo. Drive-Thru Mystics opend the show with a sound that has fun catchy choruses!!”

"The meaning behind the name Drive-Thru Mystics turned out to be a perfect fit to match the band’s fun, retro, straightforward, almost campy, garage-rock songs, with subtle nuances and lyrical content that resonates in a surprisingly thoughtful way"

"It's a bit of an oversimplification to even call Drive-Thru Mystics a retro garage-rock band. Their influences encompass no only Nuggets-era garage psychedlic rock, but 70's glam, 80's post punk, 90's droning indie pop and everything in between"

"Film maker John Water's used to make fun of the whole swinging 60's Summer of Love druggie thing. He loved the polar opposite of that whole era's values: trash and innapropriate humor. The band Drive-Thru Mystics play trippy, acid-soaked 60's psychedelic rock as though it were reinterpreted by Waters, tongue in cheek firmly planted. Its Nuggets-compilation era garage rock for the criminally insane, or at least someone who appreciates the the fun, campy side or the criminally insane"

Aaron Carnes - Sacramento News and Review
Feedback