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Carolinabound / Press

““Smith most definitely has a way with words, and uses them to vividly paint moving pictures to complement the musical collaboration of his fellow players on Smoking Gun. There is a potency and honesty to these songs, and while they may have been borne from traditional country and folk, the voice that has emerged is distinct and modern.””

"The only complaint I can muster about “Smoking Gun,” the debut EP from Chris Smith-fronted country newcomers Carolinabound is that this sublime recording is just too darn short. With six tracks clocking in at a tidy 25 minutes, “Smoking Gun” could have gone on twice as long as far as I’m concerned."

“The music of Carolinabound (AKA North Carolina-based singer-songwriter Chris Smith) draws a particular stillness from the grandeur of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Smith's countrified folk tones and whiskey-soaked melodies connect to form a curious line of affecting rhythms and lyrical introspection. On his debut EP, "Smoking Gun," he pulls from a rather long history of desperate stories of love, loss and the experiences that tie the two together. Bringing to mind scenes of front porch serenades and empty Southern roads, these songs conjure an immersive landscape where it becomes all too easy to lose your way.”

“Smith has that certain ability to meld the old time roots of this region with a more timely awareness in lyrics, presentation and structure. The songs on Love & War are not particularly plaintive or melancholy as with someone like Ray LaMontagne, but I feel both LaMontagne and Smith come from a similar school. Talented in many facets, it's Smith's storytelling that really sells these songs. It's rather intuitive to feel where he's coming from, and there's a Dylan-esque quality that pops up frequently — a complete non-sequitur that perfectly captures the essence of what he's trying to say, connecting viscerally with the listener's own absurd experience.”