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Brad Brooks / Press

“The Tucson raised, Bay area-based singer/guitarist's originals are just as impressive. For his third outing, Brooks flavors his pop with a '70s sensibility, stirring in influences from the Beatles to Hall and Oates. “Calling Everyone” is reminiscent of Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes whipping up the crowd at the Stone Pony into a sweaty frenzy. There's plenty of Beatles influences sprinkled throughout. Brooks shouts frantically like John Lennon in his Plastic Ono Band days over industrial psychedelic guitar shredding on “Spinner and the Spun.” “Steal My Disarray” sounds like George Harrison crooning over his weepy guitar. T“Exemplary Girl” could be an unlikely pairing of Paul McCartney duetting with Hall and Oates; “Will It Be Enough” sounds like Wilco's Jeff Tweedy accompanied by Harrison on guitar. But this is no nostalgia celebration, no retro shmoozefest. Although many of his instrumental influences may be based on soothing melodies from the past, Brooks'”

“Brooks flavors his pop with a '70s sensibility, stirring in influences from Beatles to Hall & Oates. “Calling Everyone” is reminiscent of Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes whipping up the crowd @ the Stone Pony into a sweaty frenzy. There's plenty of Beatles influences sprinkled throughout. Brooks shouts frantically like John Lennon in his Plastic Ono Band days over industrial psychedelic guitar shredding on “Spinner and the Spun.” “Steal My Disarray” sounds like George Harrison crooning over his weepy guitar.“Exemplary Girl” could be an unlikely pairing of Paul McCartney duetting with Hall and Oates; “Will It Be Enough” sounds like Wilco's Jeff Tweedy accompanied by Harrison on guitar. But this is no nostalgia celebration, no retro shmoozefest. Brooks' lyrics are gritty and down to earth. If you insist on labeling Brooks, pop revisionist is the best fit. In his hands, pop is taken out of the puberty market and made suitable for listeners with a little more lif”

“Brad Brooks is crafting the kind of timeless sophisticated pop revisionism that disciples of Harry Nilsson & Badfinger can dig. His third studio album, Harmony of Passing Light, opens with the cleverly arranged “Calling Everyone,” a snappy ditty wherein he grafts psychedelic West Coast grooves onto an East Coast template cut by Southside Johnny & The Asbury Jukes. And without getting into full Fab Four worship, hints of The Beatles’ influence are sprinkled throughout. Check out “Steal My Disarray,” which sounds slightly like All Things Must Pass–era George Harrison blended seamlessly into his own stylish power pop. “Spinner & the Spun” sublimely reflects the darker period of John Lennon’s tenure with The Plastic Ono Band—especially with a subtle vocal echo and frenetic guitar shredding. And if Paul McCartney ever took on blue-eyed soul, it could very well sound something like the standout cut “Exemplary Girl.””

“Brooks brand of power pop deserves widespread attention & acclaim. He's wondrously winning & versatile, both as a songwriter & as a vocalist. The soulfully celebratory Calling Everyone, merging the energies of Big Star & Van Morrison. Spinner & The Spun is a mover. Will It Be Enough has the kind of aching country-rock magic Foster & Lloyd used to conjure, with a bit of a Gram Parsons lilt. Farewell to Folderol is another beauty, & one of the all-time great song titles. There are suggestions of Nilsson, as well. Grand Manner, lowers the curtain in gorgeous style. Brooks is an exceptionally literate songwriter, fashioning highly sophisticated pop. You wont find a weak track here - each is an expertly crafted work. Despite all the classic rock influences, Brooks music takes many surprising turns, making it his and his alone. Its unfathomable why he remains a cult figure while far lesser talents squander the spotlight. Do yourself a favor & discover this amazing album.”

“On “Harmony Of Passing Light” Brooks has sacrificed none of the melodic brilliance & inventiveness of his previous work, but presents a streamlined, completely accessible suite of songs, with lyrics that pack a punch on first listen & stay with you. It's reminiscent of Skylarking-era XTC & Summerteeth-era Wilco in its melodic, broad interpretation of what a rock album can & should sound like while still feeling intimate & personal. Highlights are plentiful: the psychedelic-meets-Motown bounce of lead track "Calling Everyone" The ballads like "Bumbelina," (which you'll be involuntarily singing for weeks). Brooks can straight -up rock as well, as he does on "Spinner And The Spun." Highlight of the album is centerpiece track "Farewell To Folderol." Perhaps the track most similar to Brooks' previous work, showing his growth, and a perfect metaphor for his growth as an artist. As the song says, Brooks has decided to "Sell what we borrowed / donate what we stole / leave this town." ”

“Spill Collateral Love" Radiohead would dig Brooks.This really fine release drops out of the sky with songs that resonate like The Bends or Rufus Wainwright's simmering 1998 debut – thoughtful tracks packed with cool instrumentation, evocative, weirdly funny lyrics and an uncanny knack for making ears prick up. Brooks' gorgeous, powerful voice echoes Thom Yorke but has plenty of soft and jagged nuances all his own. There's nothing timid or withdrawn about Spill, which seems drawn from a much deeper well than most stuff out there. Lay some of the credit on producer/multi-instrumentalist Paul Hoaglin (The Mother Hips) who gives everything a lush wash worthy of Lee Hazelwood or George Martin. A nice range of moods prevails, from the handclap rush of "Lathered In Cream" to the string-boosted corridors of "Hit Me Like A Smile." It's easy to see this becoming someone's favorite album. Brooks recklessly reaches into his own chest in an effort to grab your heart. Let him & you won't be sorry”

“Brooks stretches the boundaries of power pop with Spill Collateral Love, a tour de force of different pop stylings that share the same level of inspiration. I've seen comparisons of Brooks to a number of different artists, with the consensus being that he's Freddie Mercury meets Guided by Voices. There's certainly an element of that in there, but there are several others that shine through. For example, the lead track "Love On My Sleeve" builds to a Rufus Wainwright via Thom Yorke crescendo that never wears out its welcome over nearly six minutes. "Lathered In Cream" is the closest to straight-ahead power pop, but it adds its own subversive GbV element as well. Other standouts include "The Loon of Altitude" (which starts off as a poppy-Calif-sounding ditty, only to dissolve into a "I Want You She's So Heavy" vibe. Spill Collateral Love is the power pop equivalent of an art film, & although it my lack the immediate hooks that we normally deal in here, it's worth the effort to explore.”

“Brooks is the archetypal 21st century pop maverick, beavering away with limited funds and a modest audience, but with plenty of time on his hands to get things just right. He borrows liberally from the past - think Beatles, Left Banke, Brian Wilson and some of Queen’s pomp and splendour - and completes the mix with modern influences like Rufus Wainwright and Thom Yorke at his most melodic. Needless to say, it hardly seems rocket science fusing the styles of some of the most talented and popular artists of the last 40 years, but that doesn’t quite explain why it sounds so damn good, and that so few other people seem to be doing it with quite the same zeal and, dare I say, panache”

“Power Poppin' music that forgoes conventions, leaves behind simple accepted formulas and aspires to the tattooed indie rock crowd who has no idea that a Raspberry, a Jellyfish or a Big Star has everything to do with timeless music and nothing to do with fruit and stardom.So what does it all sound like? Well, if you are familiar with the works of Jon Brion's "Meaningless" you are heading in the right direction. "Spill Collateral Love" is work of big and beautifully sublime creations for people who want their music to comfort, enrich themselves - not entertain. The spirit here is intoxicating. The music moods are kaleidoscopic without being trippy because we're talking pop music and all the arrangements fit snug inside the vision. You can hear it above, in fact. ONE OF 2007's VERY VERY BEST, we are most serious on this one”

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