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Apollo Cobra / Press

“Apollo Cobra has managed to avoid the clustered frenzy to the ultramodern by reminding us just how great unabashed, barefaced dance music can be. Built by the arguably trite dance grooves and tones of 80’s funk and disco. With its steady bass pulsations and sweeping synth leads, Apollo Cobra demonstrates a similar sound to that of Daft Punk with the same bluntly sexual energy of Chromeo and Of Montreal.On the album, the band radiates electronic dance grooves and direct, sexual lyrics that other bands would probably be scared to embrace out of fear of not being taken seriously. However, Apollo Cobra’s obvious lack of care to be taken as deep or complex demands a different kind of respect: this is dance music boldly undressed and unhidden behind any kind of ingenuous facade. Read the entire review at musicunderfire.com”

“On my last stop of the fest, I found Winona's favorite Twin Cities band. With the venue filled to capactiy, the scene at Ed's No Name Bar was incredible. Earlier in the week, the crowd at Ed's would spread out into a side room, the main room, and outdoors on the patio, but for this closing performance the entire crowd squished together in front of the stage to create a sweaty, screaming mob. Most of the audience was clearly familiar with Apollo's funky tunes and would yell out their appreciation at the beginning of each new song, and the band obliged by tearing through their own material and snippets of songs like Electric Six's "Danger! High Voltage" right up until bar close. There were certainly bigger names on the bill of this year's MWMF, but in the eyes of a lot of local fans it seemed that Apollo Cobra were the real headliners of the festival -- it was a fun and furious way to close out the weekend and it certainly ended my trip on a high note.”

“Apollo Cobra: On my last stop of the fest, I found Winona's favorite Twin Cities band. With the venue filled to capactiy, the scene at Ed's No Name Bar was incredible. Earlier in the week, the crowd at Ed's would spread out into a side room, the main room, and outdoors on the patio, but for this closing performance the entire crowd squished together in front of the stage to create a sweaty, screaming mob. Most of the audience was clearly familiar with Apollo's funky tunes and would yell out their appreciation at the beginning of each new song, and the band obliged by tearing through their own material and snippets of songs like Electric Six's "Danger! High Voltage" right up until bar close. There were certainly bigger names on the bill of this year's MWMF, but in the eyes of a lot of local fans it seemed that Apollo Cobra were the real headliners of the festival -- it was a fun and furious way to close out the weekend and it certainly ended my trip on a high note.”

“St.Paul Pioneer press votes "Dance to This" top ten album of 2010. With a title that should be taken as a directive, not just a suggestion, this three-piece synth group uses vintage equipment to create an intoxicating call to the dance floor. They're not just another updated new wave act, either, as they draw more from early rave music and, somewhat oddly, hyper-commercial early '90s dance pop.”

“Apollo Cobra’s tune, “Hey, Nice T-Shirt,” while being an instant and playful smash,s is merely a cap to a genie bottle, which when removed releases magic suitable to rival the greatest of jamtronica heavyweights. Highly recommend their live performance to anyone gracing these words”